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Wycombe Abbey is an independent girls' boarding and day school in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. It is consistently ranked as one of the top all-girls schools in academic results, The school was founded in 1896 by Dame Frances Dove, who was previously headmistress of St Leonards School in Scotland. A world leader in girls’ boarding education (11 - 18). A place where academic excellence, empathy and integrity thrive. Wycombe Abbey remains committed to providing young women with the knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve and excel in their chosen field.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Willowridge High is a young school with young ideas and many talented young people who have excelled in an environment which has nurtured enthusiasm, friendship and a pioneering spirit. We have built this ethos on the lives of four prominent South Africans who were associated with Pretoria East and the early development of the Transvaal. Our four school houses are named after them and our house badges are extracts from their original family crests. The first of these, in historical sequence, Harry Struben, is remembered as a pioneer on the gold fields. In 1860, he started a transport business between the old ZAR capital and Natal. With the profits from this business, he bought a farm, The Willows, at that time far to the east of Pretoria. As early as the start of 1985 a Vigilance Committee was elected at a meeting of prospective parents. Having been named the watchdogs, they monitored the progress of the new school, while the buildings started taking shape on the site that once had been a farm. It was due to their efforts that the school cottage and the trees, which give our schools its restful country atmosphere, were saved from the bulldozer. The Committee’s activities were, however, also directed at creating an ethos for their new school and establishing a fundamental philosophy. Our school opened its doors on Wednesday 7 January 1987 to welcome the first 187 pupils in Forms One and Two. During the first term the name Willowridge High School became official and a badge needed to be designed.

 Listings /  Africa

Westminster is an ancient school in the heart of London, the only one still to occupy its original site, immediately next to Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament. Its origins can be traced to a charity school established by the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of St Peter, and it is more than likely that this spiritual and educational tradition goes back as far as 960 AD. After the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540, King Henry VIII personally ensured the School’s survival by statute. His daughter, Queen Elizabeth I, confirmed the royal patronage in 1560 whereby the Abbey and School formed the one collegiate foundation. She is therefore celebrated as the School’s Founder and her importance is marked by a statue in Little Dean’s Yard by Matthew Spender OW, unveiled by her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in June 2010. Today, Westminster is one of the leading academic schools in the country. Pupils achieve exceptional examination results and entrance to some of the top universities in the world. It is a busy, passionate and purposeful place where independent and deep thinking is enjoyed, encouraged and respected by all, and where holistic excellence is nurtured and valued. Fundamentally, we want our pupils to engage in a constructive, thoughtful process of “loyal dissent”. While we encourage them to embrace the principles of a liberal education, respect genuine scholarship and appreciate a deep and rigorous learning process, they are equally encouraged to challenge, question and explore the content of that learning, to push boundaries and overturn expectations – mindful at all times of the feelings of others. Most importantly, we want our pupils to use their skills and intelligence to help others, to build up not put down, and to benefit society. For centuries, Westminster School has been the educational cradle of some very distinguished people. Our task is to help future generations of pupils to follow in their footsteps and make a positive difference in the world.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

It is our vision that: “EVERY CHILD HAS THE RIGHT TO GROW UP IN A LOVING AND RESPONSIBLE FAMILY” Founded as a family-run organisation, at the dawn of South African democracy in 1993, TLC Children's Home is now a board governed, fully B-BBEE compliant, registered Not-For-Profit Child and Youth Care Center (CYCC) with the Department of Social Development. We focus on providing quality attachment based, trauma informed care to the little ones in our home to best address the pre-existing and/or inutero trauma every child invariably comes to us with. We also put significant effort into championing for the right of each child to be placed into a loving and responsible family as rapidly as possible. Our purpose is to provide quality care and nurture to the vulnerable babies and children that are welcomed into our home. We undertake to care for and nurture these babies and children on a full-time basis, within a family-modeled, homely environment, whilst painstakingly pursing their rapid, responsible placement into loving forever families of their own. Our motivation and conviction is that every child has the right to a loving, caring family and that no child should be left in an orphanage. At present TLC cares for up to 34 babies all of which come to us under the age of 3 years upon admission. Since our inception in 1993, over 900 babies have come to our home. We believe that by providing quality, attachment based care to the little ones in our home and placing them into loving, permanent families, we will see the long-term benefits of providing a quality upbringing to these vulnerable children of our nation.

 Listings /  Africa

Timeout are a family run organisation, established with the aim of making a real difference to the lives of children with complex needs. The first Timeout Home was opened in Ripponden in 2004. Timeout now has 12 homes: 8 in the North West and 4 in West Yorkshire. We have developed an integrated, therapeutic, evidence-based approach to care that has enabled Timeout to become a first-call company for many local authorities. It was decided very early that to provide the kind of care we knew young people needed, we would only offer solo or dual occupancy in our homes with a minimum of 1:1 care. Each home is designed specifically to nurture young people so they can learn how to live a positive, independent life. A central part of the therapeutic development of a young person is their education. Although we strive to keep a child’s placement in mainstream schools, Timeout set up 2 specialist schools for those who have been excluded or require more detailed support. Our schools provide tailored educational programs for every pupil. The excellent quality of our schooling has led to local authorities taking day places for pupils unable to cope in mainstream education. An organisation can never be a true parent, however it can apply the values and principles of good parenting. Our aim is to achieve this through promoting an awareness of a young person’s perspective, and by never losing sight, within the ‘big picture’, of the small actions that make a real difference to young children’s daily lives.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Welcome to Swan. We’re putting outcomes at the heart of residential care for children with specialist needs. Giving children with unique circumstances, needs and strengths the chance to live their best life Our specialist residential service has been developed drawing on multi-disciplinary knowledge, research and expertise to provide the best possible response to the complex needs of children in our care - including Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Learning Difficulties, recovery from trauma and challenging behaviours. Behind Swan Children’s Homes is a highly-experienced team committed to positive outcomes through individualised care for every child. Swan Children’s Homes was founded in 2018, drawing on 11 years of experience working in partnership with local authorities to provide residential care and support for young people. Our vision for our first children’s home, Biggle Corner, was to develop - in partnership with leading experts and specialists - an innovative, residential service specifically designed to meet the needs of children with specialist/high needs (including Autism, Learning Difficulties, challenging behaviours and recovery from trauma). We are absolutely committed to working in an evidence-based and holistic way, based on clearly defined needs, strengths and outcomes for each child in our care. We believe in forming a shared vision for each child, where partnership working is key to ensuring the best possible opportunities for each child and providing the foundations that will support them through transition to permanence in a family environment.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Founded in 1953 on a farm in the Randburg district, the College today is encircled by the northern suburbs of Johannesburg. Established as a boys’ school, the College took the bold step to build a girls’ school on the campus in 1995, creating the possibility of a unique synergy model. St Stithians is a Methodist School and a circuit of the Central District of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa. The College subscribes to a Statement of Spirituality that outlines our core beliefs and values. Students enter the College through the gateway of the Junior Preparatory on the lower campus, a co-educational school of 470 to 475 girls and boys in Grades R to 2. From Grade 3 onwards, the boys and girls move into separate Preparatory Schools, the Boys' Preparatory and the Girls' Preparatory, of 410 to 420 students each. A second "gateway" into St Stithians is offered to entrants of Grade 8 as they embark on their high school journey in the Boys’ College of 770 to 780 students and the Girls’ College of 500 to 510 students. The academic programme is delivered by excellent teachers, trained to nurture inquiry, explicit thinking, and differentiated learning. The College offers academic support and extension, enriching the core experiences of teaching and learning. A number of benchmarks, both national and international, provide a framework for evaluating quality. As a member of ISASA, the College participates in the cycle of institutional evaluation provided through the Independent Quality Assurance Agency (IQAA) and St Stithians is accredited by Umalusi, the South African certification authority. St Stithians offers a diverse and rich extra-curricular programme, aimed to provide opportunities for a holistic education. All the major sports are offered, supported by excellent sporting facilities and coaching. The cultural calendar and the performing arts are integral to our education. There is a strong focus on educating leaders, who participate in rites of passage as they move through the schools. Community service activities are integrated into the curriculum, as are outdoor education camps and outings. Our campus is a place of natural beauty, with various landscape zones, and the College is committed to being an environmentally "green" school. St Stithians seeks to provide a values-based and top-quality academic education, supported by a diverse extra-curricular offering. Our students matriculate as well-rounded individuals, well prepared to inspire excellence and make a difference both in our own country, the African continent and globally.

 Listings /  Africa

St Paul’s is an independent school offering an outstanding, all-round education for gifted boys aged 7 to 18 years. Our founder John Colet opened the doors to St Paul’s School in 1509 to educate boys “from all nacions and countres indifferently”, regardless of race, creed or social background. We are committed to our founder’s vision and offer financial support for any boy who is successful in gaining a place at the school on academic merit and fulfils the means-tested bursary criteria. We wish to admit highly able, committed and curious boys. We care for them in an academic environment tailored to their specific needs and to equip them with the skills to contribute to wider society long after they have left St Paul’s. Our entry points are at 7+, 8+, 11+, 13+ and 16+ and admission is following a successful examination process and interview. This is a particularly exciting time to join the school as over the last few years we have refurbished the majority of the senior school site including a new astro-turf pitch, a stunning Drama Centre, featuring the Samuel Pepys theatre, and an RIBA award-winning Science building. In March 2020, we completed the redevelopment of the Senior School. Our two General Teaching Buildings offer a central Atrium, Colet Hall and Chapel, contemporary dining, the Kayton Library and many light airy classrooms overlooking the Thames and playing fields.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Founded in 1904, St Paul’s was one of the first schools to believe in the importance of educating women to fulfil their potential, giving them the skills and confidence to take their place with pride in a modernising and fast-moving world. That tradition remains at our core. The academic heart of St Paul’s is enhanced and lightened by the warm relationships between staff and girls, the sheer joy they have in learning, and the encouragement everyone is given to dig deeper; to explore ideas, to challenge preconceptions and to develop their own ideas. Learning here is not just about passing exams. It is about a love of academic pursuits, inspiration and imagination. It is about the quest for ‘very great wisdom and understanding, and knowledge as vast as the sands of the seashore’. From its very beginning, and in advance of its time, St Paul’s embraced a liberal ideology. We believe that true potential can only be unlocked when given the freedom to grow. Our rules are few and relationships are relaxed, yet respectful. We have no uniform and girls are encouraged to develop their own passions and interests. Our curriculum is broad with plenty of opportunity for individual research, discussion and debate. Music and drama are open to all and are performed to a very high standard. The art studio is an oasis of creative energy. Sport is played with verve and distinction, and opportunities of all sorts are magnified many times over in the clubs and societies on offer. There is never a dull moment at St Paul’s! Success here is not a collective measure. What matters to us is the happiness and achievements of each girl according to her own lights and ambitions. Our students take ownership of their lives, to embrace opportunity and to grow in resilience and self-reliance. St Paul’s is a caring and generous community. Laughter is never far from the surface and friendships abound. The girls are encouraged to develop a strong spirit of philanthropy, and to engage with those around them who are less privileged than themselves. The school itself has links with groups at home and abroad who benefit from our support. Our bursary scheme provides us with a wonderful opportunity to offer the full breadth of our education to talented girls whatever their background, and to enrich the school beyond measure with their energy and inspiration. We are proud of our school, and proud too that over the years our alumnae have contributed significantly on a national and global stage. An education at St Paul’s is an extraordinary preparation for life.

 Listings /  Global

St Mary's Ascot is a leading Roman Catholic boarding school for girls aged between 11 and 18 years set in 55 acres in the heart of Berkshire. St Mary's Ascot is a leading Roman Catholic boarding school for girls aged between 11 and 18 years set in 55 acres of beautiful grounds in the heart of Berkshire. We are a friendly, stable and caring community, proud of our academic and extra-curricular achievements and dedicated to bringing out the full potential of each of our 380 pupils. It was named 2015 "Public School of the Year" at the annual Tatler Schools Awards

 Listings /  United Kingdom

We are called to challenge the minds, feed the souls, fire the imaginations and train the bodies of the girls and young women who are entrusted to us. Our school is the place where we grow their capacity for mutual and self-respect. Here, we prepare our girls to learn and develop confidently, to build key knowledge frameworks that will stand them in good stead for the rest of their lives, to play passionately and to give generously of themselves to each other and to the wider community. We provide opportunities that build character and encourage self-sufficiency. It is our mission to assist our girls to open themselves up to all possibilities, to explore their unique potentials and to identify their distinctive and various abilities so that they can become their best selves. We call it ‘unlocking potential and building brilliance’ and believe that each young girl has her own measure of brilliance that needs to be unleashed for her to lead a happy and fulfilling life. It is an objective to provide our girls with the tools of rigorous and passionate enquiry and self-expression so that they may know themselves in the world. Education is a serious business but schools should be places of fun, community and ‘soft landings’. We strive to support our girls through our systems of pastoral care and peer group mentoring. Our school chaplain and resident counsellors are key members of our staff. Here, your girls are encouraged to “stress-test” their ideas, to learn from their mistakes, to nurture their passions and grow their interests and talents. This is a school that is supportive of and interested in each individual, a school that challenges each girl to explore and discover her best self. We are a school that celebrates diversity, and holds the concept as a core value. We encourage diversity of interests, outlooks and ambitions and do not subscribe to ‘type’. We strive to be a happy, vibrant and representative community where each person is valued in the wider South African context. We acknowledge the complexity and inequity of our country’s history and our responsibility towards the creation of an equitable society. We are proud of our rich heritage as a school that opened its doors to all races and creeds in the Apartheid era and we embrace the future enthusiastically. As critical thinkers, creative problem solvers and compassionate human beings, our girls are prepared by their educational experience to become persuasive and courageous citizens, able to take their rightful places in the larger communities of city, nation and the world.

 Listings /  Africa

The South African Children’s Home was the first welfare institution established in South Africa. The SA Children’s Home was originally housed on Cape Town’s Long Street before moving to the suburb of Gardens in 1923. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Originally known as the ‘Orphan House’ it was founded in 1808 by Mrs Moller, a wealthy Dutch widow, who was assisted in this task by members of the Groote Kerk and the Evangelical Church, two of the oldest churches in South Africa. Mrs Moller dedicated much of her life to establishing the Children’s Home and upon her death she graciously donated the bulk of her estate to her beloved orphanage. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Now more than 200 years later, the Children’s Home continues its care for children by providing a secure, friendly, homely environment for its family of 44 boys and girls.

 Listings /  Africa

Rondebosch Boys’ High School was founded in 1897 in response to the pressing need for a boys’ school in the growing suburb of Rondebosch. From humble beginnings in a rented church hall with an initial enrolment of only eight boys, the High School has flourished under the leadership of ten Headmasters. A newly constructed building in Campground Road was occupied in 1898 and served through to 1948 when the much expanded facilities were opened next to the Canigou Estate – these are the High School buildings still in use today. The Campground building is now used exclusively by the Prep School. The first Headmaster, Mr Robert Ramage, initially accommodated a few boarders in his own home and in 1900 had the foresight to purchase the nearby Canigou homestead, which became the much loved boarding house. With Canigou came extensive grounds which have been developed into the sports fields on the school side of the Black River that runs through the premises. During the 1980s appeals were made to the then government for Rondebosch to be opened to all races. This permission was denied and it was only from 1990 that Rondebosch was allowed to do so. Headmaster Chris Murison, himself a former pupil of the school, said, ‘Rondebosch boys must emerge as often as possible from their comfortable cocoon, both to render the community service their privileged position makes them capable of and also, for their own sakes, to become more aware, from first-hand experience, of the world they live in.’ Generations of Rondebosch boys have been fortunate to fall under the tutelage and guidance of excellent teachers, mentors and coaches. These include Headmasters Sydney ‘Dad’ Mason and Wally Mears, masters Arthur Jayes and Tickey de Jager and the much revered Prof I de V ‘Tinkie’ Heyns among many other legendary and much loved figures. Mr Mason’s self-imposed task was keeping in contact with all Old Boys and staff who were serving during the two World Wars. He was instrumental in helping to raise funds for the building of the Rondebosch War Memorial Library – now the Reeler Music Centre – and the Memorial Hall, which is the symbolic and spiritual center of the School. Over time, the initial basic school facilities have been expanded and enhanced with further boarding in Mason House, the multi-purpose Mears Centre, two swimming and water polo pools, squash and tennis courts, cricket pavilion, Reeler Music Centre, Chris Murison Center (library and IT), Art Center, Technology Room, Carleton Lloyd Stand, hockey Astroturfs (shared with WPCC) and several pavilions. Most of these facilities were funded by former pupils in appreciation of the education which they received at Rondebosch. Old Boys of the school have excelled in varied pursuits in science, business, law, academia, culture and sport. Alan Cormack who was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1979 for the work he did in developing the CAT scan, Reverend Peter Storey served as President of the South African Council of Churches and was chaplain to Nelson Mandela while he was imprisoned on Robben Island, the world-famous painter Gregoire Boonzaier, Chief Justice Michael Corbett who inaugurated President Nelson Mandela, cartoonist Jonathan ‘Zapiro’ Shapiro, botanist Lyall Watson and almost 70 international sportsmen all attended Rondebosch.

 Listings /  Africa

Moglie, madre, nonna, Paola Thaon di Revel ama i fiori e la natura. L'eredità è il suo background. È cresciuta in una famiglia dove la disciplina militare era un dato di fatto, così come la voglia di divertirsi. Sei sorelle e un fratello, in una grande villa chiamata “Cimena”, dove molti sono venuti in visita: da Umberto I, agli americani colti, ai vicini Bruni Tedeschi sulla stessa collina. Una vita dedicata al marito, Franco Reviglio e ai tre figli con tanti spostamenti e viaggi, in tutto il mondo. Oggi, i sette nipoti e la casa di campagna, regalano giornate intensamente soddisfacenti. Wife, mother, grandmother, Paola Thaon di Revel loves flowers and nature. Heritage is her background. She grew up in a family where military discipline was a given, as well as the desire to have fun. Six sisters and one brother, in a large villa called “Cimena”, and everyone came to visit: from Umberto I, to educated Americans, to the Bruni Tedeschi neighbours on the same hill. A life dedicated to her husband, Franco Reviglio and the three children with many moves and travels, all over the world. Today, the seven grandchildren and country house, make for intensely satisfying days.

 Partners /  Greater Europe

North London Collegiate School was founded in April 1850 by Frances Mary Buss in the family home at 46 Camden Street, Camden Town. All the family assisted with the school including her brother Septimus and her father, R.W. Buss, who illustrated Dickens' novels and whose paintings now hang in the Buss Room, in the Old House at Canons. In 1871, Miss Buss also founded Camden School for Girls for families with more modest incomes. You can find out more about her and the headmistresses who followed her in the dedicated sections below. The school, as it grew bigger, moved to Camden Road and then to Sandall Road. The site at Canons in Edgware was bought in 1929 but the school did not move there fully until May 1940. You can site in its dedicated page. North London Collegiate School is a top independent day school for girls aged 4-18. Since its founding in 1850, generations of girls have received an ambitious academic education and formed a bond with NLCS, which lasts forever. We provide a carefully judged blend of support and challenge, a friendly and warm atmosphere, glorious facilities and extensive extra-curricular activities.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Mandy Shrimpton is the quintessential people’s person. Mandy believes that success is measured by the quality of our human-relationships rather than the results we manifest through sheer will. Mandy firmly established herself as the heart of the non-profit organisation that she co-founded and ran with her adoring husband for 17 years. Mandy loves walking in nature with her family, hugging trees, and preserving the environment. She also enjoys being creative and is particularly fond of painting flowers. As a very happily married and devoted mother to four children, Mandy has cultivated a deep appreciation for the culinary arts and relishes the spare moments she gets to watch her favourite cooking shows. This initiative reflects how Mandy sees the world, helping to create positive synergy. Fostering unity and courteous community, building partner relationships and motivating affiliates. Born and bred in Africa, Mandy understands the concept of Ubuntu. I am, because we are. Together we can make the world a better place. Using her skills and experience to make a difference. Helping others see through the fog of new technologies, avoid common marketing mistakes and develop better business strategies. With a subtle blend of motherhood and effective project management, Mandy is the perfect professional partner, to show others the merits of this initiative. Shining a light on the path to prosperity, while not losing our footing in family values and humble humanity. Sharing is caring, while enriching ourselves spiritually and materially. We cannot give freely, if we don't have. "Sometimes the world makes more sense, through the eyes of a mother. Using protective instinct and family fortitude, to help one another." ~ Mandy Shrimpton

 Partners /  Africa

King’s was founded by royal charter in 1829 as the junior department of King's College London, and was originally located in Strand. During the early Victorian period, the school grew in numbers and reputation. Teachers included the artist John Sell Cotman and the poet Gabriele Rossetti, who taught Italian (his son, the famous Dante Gabriel Rossetti, joined King’s in 1837). King's was progressive in its curriculum and appointed its first science master in 1855, at a time where very few schools taught science. The first head master, John Major, served the school between 1831 and 1866, and during this time 99 King's pupils appear in the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1897, King's moved to its present site in Wimbledon and the junior school opened on the same campus in 1912. In World War I, many letters were written to the school, including some from the Battle of the Somme. During World War II, the Great Hall was damaged by bomb shrapnel; some of the damage can still be seen today. The archive collects and preserves records relating to the school’s history from its foundation to the present day. The archive is a fantastic resource, and through the hard work of our wonderful volunteers, provides a fascinating insight into the rich heritage of King's. In 2019, it was renamed the Bryan Stokes Archive, in recognition of the ex-teacher and long-serving school archivist who was a member of the King's community for over 60 years.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Over 5.7 million South Africans are HIV positive and of the country’s estimated 3.7 million orphans, about half have lost one or both parents to AIDS, while over 150,000 children are believed to be living in child-headed households. The statistics can be utterly overwhelming… But God has called us to be the solution and each of us has something we can use to play a positive role. Some will be able to give financially, others may feel called to adopt, still others to volunteer or pray. When each of us uses what we have in our hands, we can make a difference. Through Kibwe we’re currently focusing on… We have three community-based foster homes, in Kayamandi (Stellenbosch), Franschhoek and Somerset West. We’re also in the process of starting a new home in Piketberg. Living in a small family unit with a caring foster parent is a reasonable alternative for children who can’t be cared for by their biological families. They have a foster family to support and care for them and we hope that one day they’ll either be reunited with their biological families, or failing that, that we’ve provided them with the necessary grounding to lead happy, successful adult lives. As Christians, expanding our families through adoption is a natural response to our faith. As more and more members of Shofar Christian Church are adopting and fostering children, there’s a growing need for information and support for those who are embarking on this journey. As the NGO mandated with orphan care within the church, we’ve begun hosting info sessions for anyone interested in finding out more about adoption and fostering, covering topics like our Biblical mandate to care for orphans and the basics of the process, as well as testimonies from families who’ve already adopted and fostered.

 Listings /  Africa

Hope and Homes for Children was the creation of two extraordinary individuals who believed that every child had the right to grow up in a loving family. Today, the organisation that Mark and Caroline Cook started at their kitchen table in Wiltshire in 1994, is at the forefront of a growing global movement to eliminate the institutional care of children. Our mission is to be the catalyst for the global elimination of institutional care for children and our vision is a world in which children no longer suffer institutional care. In 1994, Mark Cook, a retired British Army officer, read about the plight of a group of children, struggling to survive in Sarajevo’s main orphanage at the height of the Bosnian War. He told his wife Caroline and within weeks the couple had boarded a plane to the city to see what they could do to help. When they first set eyes on the Bjelave orphanage the building was in a terrible state. It had sustained hits from mortars and heavy weapons in its exposed position on top of one of the city’s hills. The teenagers who lived there had been left to run wild, living a semi-feral existence in the ruined building and scavenging food and supplies out in the streets. The babies were down in the basement, crammed inside the only warm room in the building. The Cooks visited the orphanage for a week and promised the children that they would find a way to rebuild their home. “In order to keep that promise, we decided to start our own charity to provide homes for orphans of war or disaster”, Mark says. “We wanted to give them hope, hence Hope and Homes for Children.” The Cooks set up an office in a converted hay barn on a farm near their home in Wiltshire and this site remains the headquarters of Hope and Homes for Children today. In the early days, Mark and Caroline’s plan was to create a worldwide network of small, well-run orphanages but, by listening to the children that they were trying to help, they soon realised that they were on the wrong track. It did not matter what race, colour or creed the children were, or whether they were living in an orphanage, on the streets on in the sewers, whenever they were asked what they really wanted, their answer was always the same, “Please, please find me a family.” Mark asked one small boy on the streets of Khartoum what he thought a family and a home were and his answer was “Love”. That response was to have a defining influence on the future focus of Hope and Homes for Children. “We had presumed that what these children needed was food, a roof over their heads, a safe place to sleep and an education”, Caroline says, “but the children themselves guided us to their heart of our mission – they desperately wanted and needed to be loved. “Over the years we have visited numerous orphanages in many countries. Some were awful and smelled so bad that we felt sick and wanted to leave; others were better, being reasonably equipped and staffed. But the one thing we never found in any orphanage was the feeling of unconditional love that is at the heart of a caring family. “Love became the key to our work and we have quite unashamedly focused on and talked about it ever since.”

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Home of Hope has evolved into an organisation that takes care of children, provides education to children with special needs and helps them to become productive and responsible members of the community, continuing support into adulthood through a working care farm and skills development opportunities. Home of Hope was founded in August 2005 by Eleanor Brook, who inspired by her faith having adopted children of her own and having experienced life in a children’s home herself , wanted to harness her experience to provide support for other children in need of care. The organisation started as an interim ‘place of safety’ for children who were abandoned in dustbins to die, violently abused, raped, hungry and neglected due to poverty, infected with HIV and AIDS and those who were born bearing the effects of excessive drug and alcohol abuse by their mothers during pregnancy. During that time it was found that many of the babies leaving the care of Home of Hope would return after a couple of months. Because of this, Home of Hope began to research the possible reasons. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder was discovered and many of the characteristics of FASD were found to be present in the children. The organisation began to look deeper into this disorder, but could not find many resources, support systems or solutions. South Africa has the highest rate of FASD in the world where approx. 70 000 children are born every year suffering from this condition. 85% of children with FASD are not raised by their birth parents (usually they are in foster care or children’s homes) and come from families that are often unstable with the child being in greater risk of physical and sexual abuse or neglect. Based on the challenges in caring for children affected by FASD, Home of Hope began to evolve to provide a long-term solution for our children, as well as services for other families that care for children affected by FASD. As the organisation grew and developed, we were able to respond to a bigger need – to provide a broader and more effective service for the protection of children – more than just that of interim places of safety.

 Listings /  Africa

Anyone can be a Heritage Ambassador. Help take our past into the future. Spread the word and generate revenue. Make heritage your business and earn with your passion for art and culture. ArtAcadia.org is an umbrella organization for everything pertaining to our heritage and respective cultures. Providing a platform for Heritage Ambassadors, to help take our past into the future. We are a passionate community that is compiling a comprehensive global directory and cultural map. Facilitating networking, training, work opportunities, events and marketplace.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Been there, done that... doing it all over again! Herby, a product of South Africa, vintage '63, Internaut since '82. Roaming the world since the age of 23 to date. Jack of all trades, master of none. Techie, pilot, nomad. Can travel~live~work, anywhere. Global village citizen, living without boundaries, my primary passions are aviation, the sea and Ubuntu Synergy. I am, because we are. Together. We create unity, foster community, motivate affiliates to generate residual revenue, and facilitate networking events. It's time to LIVE your life! My mission is to help people from all walks of life, gain financial independence, while caring for the world around us. I believe charity begins at the cash register. Just say no to donations. Learn how to earn. Make sure you have a meal, an income, clothes, a home and good health. Constantly bombing your mind with books and exercise, are two battles that win the war of longevity. I want to grow old. There is no planet B. I'm a big fan of renewable resources and ethical commerce. Gardens, farming, trees and bees, and anything that carries fleas. Helping our paw-legged friends in shelters, finding furever homes much faster. Same for birds, horses, donkeys, circus prisoners and liberating zoos. Noble causes that need proactive participants. Anyone can help: Scholars, students, employment seekers, those just over broke. Single and stay-at-home parents. Business owners, administrators and managers of any ilk. Retrenched and retired folks who still have much to give. Everyone can become successful super affiliates. Generating residual income is easy, and I will be your guide. With 40+ years in technology, aviation and extensive travel, this digital nomad has a wealth of experience to share. Helping others navigate the fear of failure and proven pathway to success. Point-and-click easy here >> https://herbyolschewski.com/action/worksheet/

 Members /  WorldWide

Heaven’s Nest was established in 2004 and is an emergency foster facility for young children in need. Located in Cape Town, South Africa, we care for up to 18 children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years old, offering them a secure, loving home until they can be re-united with their families, fostered or adopted. Heaven’s Nest is a project of the Church of St Francis of Assisi in Strandfontein and the Fikelela Aids Project. Many of our children have experienced neglect and abuse which have left deep scars. So, as well as providing love, good food, basic education and health care, we also provide counselling and play therapy to all our children. The Confidentiality Clause in our Constitution, protects children from having their HIV status revealed, therefore we generally provide care to all “Children in Need” Since inception, more than 1350 children have passed through our doors with many of them being placed in improved conditions with family members, foster or adoptive parents. Heaven’s Nest has forged a link with child welfare and social service and accommodates approximately 14 -18 children at any time. We sometimes exceeds this limited to accommodate siblings. Children who are accommodated range from the age of 6 months to 8 years of age. Children placed with us have been legally declared to be in need of care and are waiting for social workers to further investigate their circumstances of need – initially 6 weeks, or they are waiting to be placed with appointed adoptive or foster parents and the process takes 6 weeks. Alternatively they are waiting for adoptive parents to be appointed this process is indeterminate. Many of the children however stay here for much longer than 6 weeks. Some even stay as long as two to four years. The programmes undertaken in these session help in the upliftment of self-esteem, confidence and ensure that these children are able to become active, mature, productive adolescence. In our 16 years of experience we have discovered that many of the children placed at the home have not been exposed to the most basic form of education with many experiencing difficulties. Their mind have been deprived of the right to basic education with which to stimulate their minds. With great success Heaven’s Nest has been able to be in the service of aiding children for the past sixteen years having been established in 2004.

 Listings /  Africa

Heatherdale Children’s Home began in 1929. Since that time it has evolved and re-focussed its vision to be relevant to the changing world of young people. We are a Level 2 Child and Youth Care Centre accommodating children in need of care. Heatherdale Children’s Home had humble beginnings, operating out of what was an old farmhouse on a spacious piece of ground made available to the church by the late Rev. T.E. Marsh (who had founded Heatherdale’s sister institution, Marsh Memorial Homes, 28 years earlier), and initially catering only for orphaned “coloured” girls. As time went by, the needs of the community changed and Heatherdale responded to these needs establishing itself as a place of safety for all children at risk from abuse, abandonment or neglect. Heatherdale Children’s Home is a level 2 Child and Youth Care Centre in Athlone, Cape Town. It operates under the auspices of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa. For many years Heatherdale has provided a safe space for vulnerable and at-risk children at risk through its residential programme. We have accommodated up to fifty (50) children, those whose homes are beset with financial difficulties, drug and alcohol problems and/or physical abuse, and who have suffered emotional trauma as a result. Through therapeutic and development programmes Heatherdale has addressed each child’s trauma and equipped them to return to their community and to a normal, healthy and independent life. For the past number of years Heatherdale has accommodated up to fifty children, 25 boys and 24 girls, aged between 5 and 18 years of age. The children are placed in our care by the Commissioner of the Children’s Court, with a social worker testifying that their home environment places them at risk. We offer a range of comprehensive programmes that encompass areas such as life skills training, therapeutic services sporting activities, spiritual development and educational support.

 Listings /  Africa

A man who lives his work passions and family with determination. A philanthropist, who has held important positions in the chemical and automotive world, in particular with Daimler AG (Mercedes-Benz). He loves to travel, attaining knowledge and experience from different cultures. These experiences have shaped him, with a particular acumen in recognizing the best in human beings. Hans thrives on helping young people, to realize their dreams, as he has realized his own. Hans is an inspirational leader, with the competence to restructure and transform organizations. He is very flexible with people, and stands like a rock when it comes to principles. Whatever happens, he will always stay positive.

 Partners /  Greater Europe

When the first Headmistress, Miss A Morton, opened the school at Haydon Place on the 25 April 1887, she was greeted by the appointed caretaker with the news “there ain’t no one come yet ma'am”. Undaunted, Miss Morton had acquired two pupils by the end of her first week and with support from the Church Schools Company over the subsequent months, the school was born. We provide an inspiring, first-class education for academically able and characterful girls from age four to eighteen. Guildford High School, which is separated into a Junior School and Senior School, is a happy, purposeful, and vibrant community that centres on eight key aims. All that we do at Guildford High School is designed with our pupils in mind. We nurture our pupils as they grow up in our care, providing an environment of openness, where they feel safe and secure, where there is trust and kindness. We want our pupils to lead happy and fulfilling lives and to be positive about their own gifts and abilities.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Goodwill Children's Homes is a registered UK charity that works with our partner Society registered in South India as 'Goodwill Children's Homes Charitable Society'. Goodwill has been supporting the care and education of destitute and orphaned children in southern India since 1976. We provide a loving home and a meaningful education to many destitute children. We run three residential homes, a primary school and a Tribal Outreach Programme (TORP). Most Goodwill children come from the tribal communities living in the mountain ranges of the Palani Hills. We look after children who have either been orphaned or come from families that are simply too poor to provide essential shelter, food, and education. Goodwill is able to provide them with a loving home and the life chances that their families cannot.Thandigudi is home to children aged between 5 and 11. This was the first home built by Goodwill over 30 years ago. Thandigudi has its own primary school where all the children attend. Pattiveeranpatti is our girls' home located at the foot of the mountains and house girls aged between 11 and 18 who attend the local school. Sanarpatti is our newest site, and home to boys aged between 11 and 18 who also attend a local secondary school. TORP was started in 2002 with the aim of educating tribal children while they remain with their own families and communities. We either assist the poorest families keep their children in education, or for those children who do not wish to continue with academic study, we offer skills training in trades such as tailoring and electrical wiring that will provide them with a living and benefit their communities.

 Listings /  Asia

The Godolphin and Latymer School is a day school for 800 girls aged between 11 and 18. It began in 1861 as the Godolphin School, a boys’ boarding school set in fields near the River Thames in Hammersmith. Our main buildings date from this time. The boys’ school did not thrive, however, and in 1905 a new independent day school for girls was created on the same site. Support from the Latymer foundation resulted in a new name: the Godolphin and Latymer School. Following the end of the Second World War and the transformational Education Act of 1944, Dame Joyce Bishop (Head from 1935 to 1963) took the decision that Godolphin and Latymer should become a state grammar school. Thus it was free to offer places to bright girls totally regardless of their parents’ background or income. Dame Joyce’s vision resonates strongly with the school today: ‘Each member of this new community of schools has its own function to perform, its own gifts to offer. For us, it is to foster scholarship and sound learning, to follow knowledge like a shooting star and to offer humbly an imaginative understanding of our fellow creatures born of this pursuit of wisdom, a charity that rejoices in the truth. Surely all this must continue to flourish and to gain fresh vitality as we open wider our window of experience and share with all schools the task of educating the nation.’ In 1977 grammar school status was removed from many London schools and Godolphin and Latymer reverted to the independent sector. Subsequent years have seen a growth in numbers, much modernisation in educational outlook, and the imaginative development of our Hammersmith site. We enjoy our history, but our eyes always look towards the future!

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Die GLS Bank ist in Deutschland die Refernz für sozial und ökologisches Banking. Wer bei der GLS Bank Kunde ist, kann sich sicher sein, dass sein Geld dazu beiträgt die Zukunft zu gestalten, die wir uns alle wüsnchen. Investitionen gehen in eigens sehr strickt aufgelegte Fonds welche das 1.5°C Ziel bereits erfüllen. Keine Kinderarbeit, keine Waffen, kein Genforschung oder andere negativ Themen - sondern erneuerbare Energien, Soziales und Kultur, ökologische Landwirtschaft, Ernährung, nachhaltige Wirtschaft und weitere positiv beitragende Vorhaben werden ausschließlich unterstützt. Als Kunde bei der Bank trägt man dazu bei, dass ausschließlich diese positiven Projekte gefördert werden. Der strickte Zuspruch zu sozial und ökologischen Projekten wird bei allen Produkten, die ein Kunde von seiner Bank kennt (Baugredite, Firmenkredite, Altersovrsorge, Anlagen, Investitionen etc) unabweichlich eingehalten. Privatpersonen, Firmen und Vereine werden darüber hinaus aktiv unterstützt ihrn eigenen Impact zu verbessern. Die GLS Bank ist eine Universal-Bank, bei welcher man nahezu alle Finanzdienstleistungen in Anspruch nehmen kann - jedoch immer unter einer strickten sozial, ökologischen und nachhaltigen Perspektive. Die Bank ist überwiegend in Deutschland tätig. Es können alle Dienste online wahrgenommen werden und es gibt mehrere Filialen für den persönlichen Besuch. Desweiteren besticht die Bank durch Ihre Rechtsform, die Genossenschaft. Die mitgleiderbestimmte Gesellschaftsform ist darauf gegründet in Gemeinschaft einen gesellschaftlich positiven Beitrag zu leisten. Mit der GLS Bank gibt es keinen Bedarf mehr als Privatperson sowie Firma bei einer konventionellen Bank zu sein und indirekt Umweltvernichtende Projekte zu unterstützen. Die GLS Bank bietet den vollumassenden Banken-Service mit reinem und ehrlichem guten Gewissen. Klimaschutz kann so einfach sein: Werde jetzt Mitglied bei der GLS Bank. The GLS Bank is the reference for social and ecological banking in Germany. Anyone who is a customer of GLS Bank can be sure that their money will help shape the future that we all want. Investments are made in specially designed funds that already meet the 1.5 ° C target. No child labor, no weapons, no genetic research or other negative topics - only renewable energies, social affairs and culture, ecological agriculture, nutrition, sustainable economy and other positively contributing projects are exclusively supported. As a customer at the bank, you help ensure that only these positive projects are funded. The strict encouragement to social and ecological projects is inevitably complied with for all products that a customer knows from their bank (building loans, corporate loans, old-age provision, systems, investments, etc.). Private individuals, companies and associations are also actively supported to improve their own impact. The GLS Bank is a universal bank, where you can take advantage of almost all financial services - but always under a strict social, ecological and sustainable perspective. The bank operates predominantly in Germany. All services can be used online and there are several branches for personal visits. Furthermore, the bank impresses with its legal form, the cooperative. The member-determined form of society is based on making a socially positive contribution in community. With the GLS Bank, there is no longer any need to be a private person or company with a conventional bank and indirectly support environmentally damaging projects. GLS Bank offers the full banking service with a clear and honest good conscience. Climate protection can be so easy: become a member of GLS Bank now.

 Partners /  Greater Europe

Eden Schools were established in Gauteng over 30 years ago. The Chief Executive of Eden, Mr Allan Zulberg, co-founded Eden in 1974. He played a leading role in the establishment of Midrand University and Educor. He was an executive director of Educor. He also served as Chief Executive of King David Schools for a time. Mr Zulberg taught Mathematics and Physical Science for many years, and also served as headmaster of Eden Lyndhurst. Eden Schools operate in Lyndhurst, Randburg and Durban. Its head office is in Lyndhurst, Johannesburg. Mr Joe Khouri is Chief Operating Officer, an educator, past principal and lecturer at Wits University. Mr Allan Fehler is the group's Financial Director.[citation needed] In 2007 Eden opened in Durban. The school was previously managed by Crawfordschools. The school operates a Pre-Primary, Preparatory, Middle School and College High School in Glenmore.

 Listings /  Africa

The Durbanville Children's Home opened its doors in 1883 and is celebrating 130 years of care to children in need in 2013. We have 144 children aged from 2 to 18 at our home and are a non-profit, church based residential care home who looks after children in need of care from all communities of the Cape Peninsula. We are recognised as a model for child and youth care in a therapeutic milieu. The Children‘s Home receive 32% subsidy from the Government, therefore we are very dependent on local and foreign communities for funds and donations.

 Listings /  Africa

Durban Girls High School was founded in 1882. Our academic focus is based on the strong work ethic of both staff and learners. This is enhanced by state of the art technology and fully equipped venues which provide outstanding teaching resources. Cultural opportunities offer learners a platform from which to develop self-expression, creativity and explore their own ideas in a supportive environment while service activities reinforce the values of empathy and community. We offer a comprehensive sport programme that encompasses both the competitive and wellness elements of physical activity. We view sport as essential for the development of health, self-discipline and team work. We offer a range of diverse leadership opportunities, offering learners the chance to build their skills and put them into practice.

 Listings /  Africa

Curro was established in 1998 and is the leading for-profit independent school provider in southern Africa. It develops, acquires and manages independent schools for learners from three months to Grade 12. We believe the purpose of education is to empower every person with the opportunity to achieve their potential as individuals and members of society. We further believe that education is the cornerstone in the development of quality leaders and responsible citizens who will positively impact the economy, environment and society. Our vision is to make independent school education accessible to more learners throughout southern Africa. Our value system is based on four pillars: Child-friendliness, Positive discipline, Christian ethos (ethics and morals), Creative thinking. Curro created a balanced educational space in which learners can learn and grow, as encompassed in the name of the group, ‘Curro’, which in Latin means 'I run'. Within the education context it can be interpreted as: ‘I learn at my own learning pace and according to my own aptitude, attitude and talents.’ These principles form the foundation of Curro’s ethical standards, which are included in the group’s code of ethics, codes of conduct, good citizenship and related policies. South African education has seen many transformations since 1994. However, despite a substantial allocation of the national budget to education, the increasing demand for high quality schools and teachers remains insatiable. Despite making progress in creating equal opportunities for learners, government still faces great challenges in providing education at an acceptable standard. Understandably, their efforts are targeted where the situation is most dire. However, this creates a vacuum in terms of facilities and standards at the lower to middle of the market, as well as for new campuses in the more affluent areas. This has led to the private sector increasingly playing its part. Section 29 of the South African Constitution enshrines and protects the valuable role of independent schools in this regard.  Against this background, we aim to develop a large number of independent schools across South Africa and the rest of Africa. Development of independent schools creates opportunities in public schools for new enrolments and saves the state significant capital outlay and running costs. A joint venture between various investors and Old Mutual’s Schools Fund will accelerate access to quality education. It will also support government in addressing South Africa’s educational needs in the lower-income market under the brand of Meridian Schools. Curro will expand its independent school group through new developments and acquisitions. This strategy will not only support the public sector but will provide parents with additional options for their children’s education, as independent schools increasingly improve educational standards – this will positively impact the development of the South African population and economic growth.

 Listings /  Africa

Crawford International has been a part of South African education for over 20 years. The schools that make up the Crawford collection constitute the largest single private school organisation in South Africa. Crawford International boasts twenty-two of the top schools in South Africa. Together they have challenged every traditional and conventional practice in education in our country. Their academic success is proven. Crawford International is a trailblazer in innovative and forward-thinking education. Every student is acknowledged and offered the opportunity to excel. The child-centred approach inherent in every school ensures that students examine and realise their own potential. Crawford International offers an academic foundation of the highest order and ensures that each student is a fully-rounded person. Cultural success is a cornerstone of every school, while sport is enjoyed by every sports-loving student and community involvement is celebrated by every civic-minded citizen.

 Listings /  Africa

La Comunità Mamma-Bimbo accoglie donne italiane e straniere, gestanti o con figli minori che vivono situazioni di violenza, alta conflittualità familiare e forme di marginalità sociale che possono avere pesanti ripercussioni sulla salute psicofisica del bambino e della donna. Offre protezione e sostegno al nucleo mamma-bimbo, consente l’osservazione e il supporto della funzione genitoriale. Oltre al percorso comunitario si progetta la fase di reinserimento e autonomia del nucleo. Laddove possibile (e mai nei casi di violenza intrafamiliare), vengono attivati percorsi di coinvolgimento dei papà o interventi di sostegno alla cogenitorialità. La comunità promuove attività di supporto specifico alla genitorialità come la psicomotricità o gruppi di confronto su tematiche comuni alle mamme presenti in struttura.

 Listings /  Greater Europe

John Carpenter, Town Clerk of London in the reign of Henry V, was famous as the author of the Liber Albus, a compilation of the laws, customs and privileges of the City, the memory of which had been threatened by the depredations of the plague. Property left on Carpenter’s death in 1442 was devoted to the education of four boys who were attached to the Chapel of the Guildhall, whose library Carpenter had helped to found. After the suppression of the Chapel in 1546, these ‘Carpenter’s Children’ led a wandering existence, being educated for a time at Tonbridge School. By the beginning of the nineteenth century the accumulated funds greatly exceeded the cost of their education. Warren Stormes Hale, a future Lord Mayor, worked for the creation of a permanent school. In his negotiations in the City, Hale drew support from progressive educationalists such as George Birkbeck, and, above all, the Whig Lord Chancellor, Lord Brougham, a radical patrician with the vision and drive to push the necessary Act through Parliament in 1834. In the Act, the Corporation of London took over the Carpenter Estates and created a School Committee as the governing body. Unusually, there was to be no religious test for either boys or masters. The curriculum laid down by the Committee broke with the customary monopoly of classics, and specified science and a range of modern languages, taught by native speakers, and Hebrew. The new School, a neo-Gothic structure designed by J B Bunning for 400 boys opened its doors in Milk Street in 1837. At City of London School, we understand that for boys to thrive they must be happy. It is why we cherish individuality, shun stereotypes, and encourage every pupil to be the very best version of themselves. With a vibrant, multicultural city on our doorstep, we draw strength from difference, recognising that diverse perspectives can help answer big questions. As a result, every member of our community is keenly aware of their responsibility and capacity to make a difference, right now. Through it all, we ensure our pupils are ready for the rapidly changing demands of the coming decades. This shows in our commitment to academic excellence, but also in our restless curiosity and desire to improve in everything we do. It means our pupils are equipped to provide the kind, inquisitive and respectful leadership that our society will so urgently require in the decades ahead.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

At Christine Revell Children’s Home we provide full-time care for up to 49 babies and children from birth to five years of age who have been referred to us by social workers and placed here by order of a children’s court. The children are either neglected, abandoned, abused, orphaned and are accepted at the home irrespective of HIV status, race or gender. We strive to create a warm, friendly and homely environment, but our ultimate aim is to re-unite a child with its parents or the extended family should circumstances permit. Children are also placed into foster care with suitable families in the communities and when the proper legal channels have been followed children can also be adopted. These decisions are always taken with the full involvement of our social worker, the social worker who referred the child to us, the family and children’s courts. Many of the children who arrive at our Home have not had the chance to grow and develop normally. A healthy and nutritious diet, suitable exercise and the mental development of our children are therefore of great importance. With this in mind we run a crèche weekdays from 08:00 to 11:45 where we develop the children mentally, physically, emotionally and socially.

 Listings /  Africa

Taking our past into the future with Carolina Reviglio! Carolina enjoyed a carefree childhood in the Piedmont countryside. With many cousins and friends, the passion for culture was instilled from an early age. Surrounded by beauty and art in the family mansion Cimena, expertly curated by her grandmother namesake, Carolina. On the paternal side of the family, her Venetian grandmother was equally influential. The unique character and rich culture of Venice, epitomizes Carolina. While travelling often, she feels most at home, in the isles of Venice. Schooled in Italy and the United States, lived in provinces throughout the length of Italy, Carolina considers herself truly Italian, with an international vision. “My country is rich in heritage, but poor in the pocket to keep it so. It saddens me to see so many buildings in a state of disrepair.” She has honed the skills of renovation and interiors of historic buildings, since 1987. Learning by trial and error, spurned on by failure and ultimate success, Carolina has grown and prospered. Now is the time to give back. Helping artisans of all disciplines to find work and ply their trade with pride. Matching projects to professionals and vice versa. As Heritage Doyenne, Carolina’s primary contribution to this unique initiative, is to encourage the participation of Heritage Ambassadors. This cause is yet another open avenue, to take our past into the future. By intertwining culture and heritage, to create more synergy. “Only once we fully understand where we come from… and truly appreciate our heritage… can we imagine a fabulous future filled with the richness of our past. Life is ours to design!” ~ Carolina Reviglio

 Partners /  Greater Europe

The Bloemhof Girls' High School, located along the Eerste River in Stellenbosch, is the oldest Afrikaans medium school for girls in South Africa and has been named the best high school with Afrikaans as the medium of instruction in the Western Cape since 2017. In 2021, Bloemhof will be named the best Afrikaans medium high school in the country - a great honor! Bloemhof is synonymous with excellent academic results and learners who bridge the gap between school and university with ease. High-performance sports, professional coaches and world-class facilities help our learners to compete against the best in SA. We offer a wide range of cultural activities that hone social skills and regularly enjoy exposure at the national level.

 Listings /  Africa

The Diocesan School of the Diocese of Cape Town - for boys only, normal in those times - was established in 1849 by Bishop Robert Gray, and opened its doors in Maynier’s Cottage in the grounds of the Bishop’s residence, Protea, now called Bishopscourt. Its object was ‘to give a sound Education to the Youth of the Colony’, conducted on the principles of the English Church. The first Principal was the Revd HM White, an English clergyman. Gray clearly had it in mind that this school would be different from the other grammar schools that he was establishing during the first years of his time in South Africa. He envisaged a lower school (boys aged 10 to 17) and an upper department (boys older than that) and when in 1874 the University of the Cape of Good Hope was instituted, university classes were set up as part of the Collegiate School, this was clearly in line with Gray’s orginal intentions. As the formal name of the school is quite a mouthful, the school has been referred to as ‘Bishops’ (the school of the Bishop) from the very beginning. The most worthwhile legacy you can leave your son is an education that recognises and encourages that special spark within each boy to catch fire; that provides him with the best academic grounding he can get, the foundation of a healthy physical lifestyle, opportunities to develop his cultural and social world, and one that enfolds him with values, and an understanding of the role of a spiritual component to life. As a boys’ school, we actively address what it means to be a boy, and how young boys can develop into mature men. Once a boy leaves school, it is right that he turns to new opportunities, new challenges, but we believe that the bond formed at school should be maintained and that friendships grown in school can be encouraged to remain through the association with the old boys’ union. Bishops aims in all we do to inspire our boys to find something that they are passionate about, and then provide them with all the resources possible to develop that passion. We expose boys to a wide range of activities, and watch closely to see what catches, what grows. Our boys are hugely busy, but in the end, they benefit from and enjoy the range of things they can do. The education we provide is based on the South African National curriculum, and we offer a wide range of subjects within a technology rich environment – one which provides them with exposure to the connectedness and resources of today’s world. Our boys produce exam results which have been ranked in the top ten schools of the Western Cape for the past four years, they participate in and achieve good results in national Olympiads. Our classroom are richly resourced, and our teaching staff are men and women of the highest calling. All boys engage with sport in various ways. At the heart of their sporting requirements lies the belief that boys need vigorous physical activity to grow; that healthy competition results in maturity of spirit; that habits of exercise that are planted young continue to provide benefits long after school has been left behind them, and we know that the sharing of victory and defeat in games contributes massively to the camaraderie and fellowship which binds the school and the family of the school together. We all live in cultural and social contexts, and activities which expose us to our cultural backgrounds and to the cultural diversity of South Africa develop and enrich us. The annual Eisteddfod in which all boys take part is one of the key highlights of each year; the dramatic, musical and social events each year ensures that everyone can both observe and participate in. We believe that the role of a values-based life-style in the development of fully rounded and fulfilled men is vital, and we constantly return to our values base to determine actions and programmes in the school. We are an Anglican Christian foundation, and Chapel plays a role in the daily life of the school, but we are open to all faiths, and we make provision for boys to meet their own religious practices. We know that the bonds forged between boys at school endure, and provide support and strength to many during both the good and bad times that life confronts us with. The Old Diocesan Union has branches all over the world, and reunions held at the school regularly bring together huge numbers of old boys, even up to fifty or sixty years after they had left school. We respect these gatherings within the school, because joining the school as a boy becomes a life-long journey with the school’s wider family.

 Listings /  Africa

Our community in Khayelitsha is afflicted by the largest HIV/Aids epidemic in the world, an increasing number of orphaned/vulnerable children, and an unemployment that stands at a staggering 54.1% or higher. The vision of Baphumelele is to provide a temporary shelter for vulnerable/orphaned children and young adults with chronic diseases and HIV/Aids, and to provide skills development for the unemployed, early childhood care, alleviation of poverty, and healthcare information to the community in Khayelitsha and surroundings, so that the lives of everyone we touch can become more productive and accepted individuals who make a difference within society. In 1989, Rosalia Mashale “Mama Rosie” to those around her, a trained primary school teacher, moved from the Eastern Cape toKhayelitsha in the Western Cape Province. Rosie was disturbed to see young children going through the rubbish dump in search for food while their parents were away during the day, either at work or in search of work. She responded by taking children into her home, and together with a group of women from the community, began looking after these unsupervised children. After the first week, 36 children had joined their charge. The name given to this project was Baphumelele (pronounced: ba-poo-meh-leh-leh), a Xhosa word meaning “you have progressed”. From these humble beginnings Baphumelele Educare Centre was founded. Today the centre is an established community crèche and Grade R (preschool) caring for roughly 250 children aged three months to six years. While the Educare Centre had developed a reputation for looking after children, Rosie also felt a calling to reach out to orphaned children in the community. To that end, Baphumelele Children’s Home was created as a place of safety for abandoned, abused, neglected or orphaned children, many of whom have been affected by the HIV/Aids pandemic or have HIV/Aids themselves. Through the hard work, determination, and help of the community and friends overseas, Baphumelele has developed into a thriving community project over the years. In addition to the Children’s Home and Educare Centre, Baphumelele has expanded to include the Adult Respite Care Centre, Child Respite Centre, Hospice in the Home, Child Headed Households, Fountain of Hope, and Rosie’s Bakery/Sewing Project. Mama Rosie is a visionary paradigm-shifter whose leadership and vision continue to grow and shape Baphumelele today.

 Listings /  Africa

In 1869, the Reverend Thomas Bowman Stephenson saw some children living rough under the arches of Waterloo Station Instead of walking by, he stopped to listen to their stories. Then he worked out the most practical way to help. Stephenson was a Methodist minister from the North East of England. He was also passionate about social justice. So when he moved to London, he challenged the Methodist Church to take action to help children living on the streets. Stephenson’s work led to the creation of the National Children’s Home (NCH). In 1994 we became NCH Action for Children. We’ve been Action for Children since 2008. Our vision is that every child and young person has a safe and happy childhood, and the foundations they need to thrive. We put children at the heart of everything we do. That includes our mission and values. They’re our blueprint for the way we work. We protect and support children and young people. We do this by providing practical and emotional care and support. We make sure their voices are heard. And we campaign to bring lasting improvements to their lives.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

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Wycombe Abbey is an independent girls' boarding and day school in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. It is consistently ranked as one of the top all-girls schools in academic results, The school was founded in 1896 by Dame Frances Dove, who was previously headmistress of St Leonards School in Scotland. A world leader in girls’ boarding education (11 - 18). A place where academic excellence, empathy and integrity thrive. Wycombe Abbey remains committed to providing young women with the knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve and excel in their chosen field.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Willowridge High is a young school with young ideas and many talented young people who have excelled in an environment which has nurtured enthusiasm, friendship and a pioneering spirit. We have built this ethos on the lives of four prominent South Africans who were associated with Pretoria East and the early development of the Transvaal. Our four school houses are named after them and our house badges are extracts from their original family crests. The first of these, in historical sequence, Harry Struben, is remembered as a pioneer on the gold fields. In 1860, he started a transport business between the old ZAR capital and Natal. With the profits from this business, he bought a farm, The Willows, at that time far to the east of Pretoria. As early as the start of 1985 a Vigilance Committee was elected at a meeting of prospective parents. Having been named the watchdogs, they monitored the progress of the new school, while the buildings started taking shape on the site that once had been a farm. It was due to their efforts that the school cottage and the trees, which give our schools its restful country atmosphere, were saved from the bulldozer. The Committee’s activities were, however, also directed at creating an ethos for their new school and establishing a fundamental philosophy. Our school opened its doors on Wednesday 7 January 1987 to welcome the first 187 pupils in Forms One and Two. During the first term the name Willowridge High School became official and a badge needed to be designed.

 Listings /  Africa

Westminster is an ancient school in the heart of London, the only one still to occupy its original site, immediately next to Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament. Its origins can be traced to a charity school established by the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of St Peter, and it is more than likely that this spiritual and educational tradition goes back as far as 960 AD. After the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540, King Henry VIII personally ensured the School’s survival by statute. His daughter, Queen Elizabeth I, confirmed the royal patronage in 1560 whereby the Abbey and School formed the one collegiate foundation. She is therefore celebrated as the School’s Founder and her importance is marked by a statue in Little Dean’s Yard by Matthew Spender OW, unveiled by her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in June 2010. Today, Westminster is one of the leading academic schools in the country. Pupils achieve exceptional examination results and entrance to some of the top universities in the world. It is a busy, passionate and purposeful place where independent and deep thinking is enjoyed, encouraged and respected by all, and where holistic excellence is nurtured and valued. Fundamentally, we want our pupils to engage in a constructive, thoughtful process of “loyal dissent”. While we encourage them to embrace the principles of a liberal education, respect genuine scholarship and appreciate a deep and rigorous learning process, they are equally encouraged to challenge, question and explore the content of that learning, to push boundaries and overturn expectations – mindful at all times of the feelings of others. Most importantly, we want our pupils to use their skills and intelligence to help others, to build up not put down, and to benefit society. For centuries, Westminster School has been the educational cradle of some very distinguished people. Our task is to help future generations of pupils to follow in their footsteps and make a positive difference in the world.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

It is our vision that: “EVERY CHILD HAS THE RIGHT TO GROW UP IN A LOVING AND RESPONSIBLE FAMILY” Founded as a family-run organisation, at the dawn of South African democracy in 1993, TLC Children's Home is now a board governed, fully B-BBEE compliant, registered Not-For-Profit Child and Youth Care Center (CYCC) with the Department of Social Development. We focus on providing quality attachment based, trauma informed care to the little ones in our home to best address the pre-existing and/or inutero trauma every child invariably comes to us with. We also put significant effort into championing for the right of each child to be placed into a loving and responsible family as rapidly as possible. Our purpose is to provide quality care and nurture to the vulnerable babies and children that are welcomed into our home. We undertake to care for and nurture these babies and children on a full-time basis, within a family-modeled, homely environment, whilst painstakingly pursing their rapid, responsible placement into loving forever families of their own. Our motivation and conviction is that every child has the right to a loving, caring family and that no child should be left in an orphanage. At present TLC cares for up to 34 babies all of which come to us under the age of 3 years upon admission. Since our inception in 1993, over 900 babies have come to our home. We believe that by providing quality, attachment based care to the little ones in our home and placing them into loving, permanent families, we will see the long-term benefits of providing a quality upbringing to these vulnerable children of our nation.

 Listings /  Africa

Timeout are a family run organisation, established with the aim of making a real difference to the lives of children with complex needs. The first Timeout Home was opened in Ripponden in 2004. Timeout now has 12 homes: 8 in the North West and 4 in West Yorkshire. We have developed an integrated, therapeutic, evidence-based approach to care that has enabled Timeout to become a first-call company for many local authorities. It was decided very early that to provide the kind of care we knew young people needed, we would only offer solo or dual occupancy in our homes with a minimum of 1:1 care. Each home is designed specifically to nurture young people so they can learn how to live a positive, independent life. A central part of the therapeutic development of a young person is their education. Although we strive to keep a child’s placement in mainstream schools, Timeout set up 2 specialist schools for those who have been excluded or require more detailed support. Our schools provide tailored educational programs for every pupil. The excellent quality of our schooling has led to local authorities taking day places for pupils unable to cope in mainstream education. An organisation can never be a true parent, however it can apply the values and principles of good parenting. Our aim is to achieve this through promoting an awareness of a young person’s perspective, and by never losing sight, within the ‘big picture’, of the small actions that make a real difference to young children’s daily lives.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Welcome to Swan. We’re putting outcomes at the heart of residential care for children with specialist needs. Giving children with unique circumstances, needs and strengths the chance to live their best life Our specialist residential service has been developed drawing on multi-disciplinary knowledge, research and expertise to provide the best possible response to the complex needs of children in our care - including Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Learning Difficulties, recovery from trauma and challenging behaviours. Behind Swan Children’s Homes is a highly-experienced team committed to positive outcomes through individualised care for every child. Swan Children’s Homes was founded in 2018, drawing on 11 years of experience working in partnership with local authorities to provide residential care and support for young people. Our vision for our first children’s home, Biggle Corner, was to develop - in partnership with leading experts and specialists - an innovative, residential service specifically designed to meet the needs of children with specialist/high needs (including Autism, Learning Difficulties, challenging behaviours and recovery from trauma). We are absolutely committed to working in an evidence-based and holistic way, based on clearly defined needs, strengths and outcomes for each child in our care. We believe in forming a shared vision for each child, where partnership working is key to ensuring the best possible opportunities for each child and providing the foundations that will support them through transition to permanence in a family environment.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Founded in 1953 on a farm in the Randburg district, the College today is encircled by the northern suburbs of Johannesburg. Established as a boys’ school, the College took the bold step to build a girls’ school on the campus in 1995, creating the possibility of a unique synergy model. St Stithians is a Methodist School and a circuit of the Central District of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa. The College subscribes to a Statement of Spirituality that outlines our core beliefs and values. Students enter the College through the gateway of the Junior Preparatory on the lower campus, a co-educational school of 470 to 475 girls and boys in Grades R to 2. From Grade 3 onwards, the boys and girls move into separate Preparatory Schools, the Boys' Preparatory and the Girls' Preparatory, of 410 to 420 students each. A second "gateway" into St Stithians is offered to entrants of Grade 8 as they embark on their high school journey in the Boys’ College of 770 to 780 students and the Girls’ College of 500 to 510 students. The academic programme is delivered by excellent teachers, trained to nurture inquiry, explicit thinking, and differentiated learning. The College offers academic support and extension, enriching the core experiences of teaching and learning. A number of benchmarks, both national and international, provide a framework for evaluating quality. As a member of ISASA, the College participates in the cycle of institutional evaluation provided through the Independent Quality Assurance Agency (IQAA) and St Stithians is accredited by Umalusi, the South African certification authority. St Stithians offers a diverse and rich extra-curricular programme, aimed to provide opportunities for a holistic education. All the major sports are offered, supported by excellent sporting facilities and coaching. The cultural calendar and the performing arts are integral to our education. There is a strong focus on educating leaders, who participate in rites of passage as they move through the schools. Community service activities are integrated into the curriculum, as are outdoor education camps and outings. Our campus is a place of natural beauty, with various landscape zones, and the College is committed to being an environmentally "green" school. St Stithians seeks to provide a values-based and top-quality academic education, supported by a diverse extra-curricular offering. Our students matriculate as well-rounded individuals, well prepared to inspire excellence and make a difference both in our own country, the African continent and globally.

 Listings /  Africa

St Paul’s is an independent school offering an outstanding, all-round education for gifted boys aged 7 to 18 years. Our founder John Colet opened the doors to St Paul’s School in 1509 to educate boys “from all nacions and countres indifferently”, regardless of race, creed or social background. We are committed to our founder’s vision and offer financial support for any boy who is successful in gaining a place at the school on academic merit and fulfils the means-tested bursary criteria. We wish to admit highly able, committed and curious boys. We care for them in an academic environment tailored to their specific needs and to equip them with the skills to contribute to wider society long after they have left St Paul’s. Our entry points are at 7+, 8+, 11+, 13+ and 16+ and admission is following a successful examination process and interview. This is a particularly exciting time to join the school as over the last few years we have refurbished the majority of the senior school site including a new astro-turf pitch, a stunning Drama Centre, featuring the Samuel Pepys theatre, and an RIBA award-winning Science building. In March 2020, we completed the redevelopment of the Senior School. Our two General Teaching Buildings offer a central Atrium, Colet Hall and Chapel, contemporary dining, the Kayton Library and many light airy classrooms overlooking the Thames and playing fields.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Founded in 1904, St Paul’s was one of the first schools to believe in the importance of educating women to fulfil their potential, giving them the skills and confidence to take their place with pride in a modernising and fast-moving world. That tradition remains at our core. The academic heart of St Paul’s is enhanced and lightened by the warm relationships between staff and girls, the sheer joy they have in learning, and the encouragement everyone is given to dig deeper; to explore ideas, to challenge preconceptions and to develop their own ideas. Learning here is not just about passing exams. It is about a love of academic pursuits, inspiration and imagination. It is about the quest for ‘very great wisdom and understanding, and knowledge as vast as the sands of the seashore’. From its very beginning, and in advance of its time, St Paul’s embraced a liberal ideology. We believe that true potential can only be unlocked when given the freedom to grow. Our rules are few and relationships are relaxed, yet respectful. We have no uniform and girls are encouraged to develop their own passions and interests. Our curriculum is broad with plenty of opportunity for individual research, discussion and debate. Music and drama are open to all and are performed to a very high standard. The art studio is an oasis of creative energy. Sport is played with verve and distinction, and opportunities of all sorts are magnified many times over in the clubs and societies on offer. There is never a dull moment at St Paul’s! Success here is not a collective measure. What matters to us is the happiness and achievements of each girl according to her own lights and ambitions. Our students take ownership of their lives, to embrace opportunity and to grow in resilience and self-reliance. St Paul’s is a caring and generous community. Laughter is never far from the surface and friendships abound. The girls are encouraged to develop a strong spirit of philanthropy, and to engage with those around them who are less privileged than themselves. The school itself has links with groups at home and abroad who benefit from our support. Our bursary scheme provides us with a wonderful opportunity to offer the full breadth of our education to talented girls whatever their background, and to enrich the school beyond measure with their energy and inspiration. We are proud of our school, and proud too that over the years our alumnae have contributed significantly on a national and global stage. An education at St Paul’s is an extraordinary preparation for life.

 Listings /  Global

St Mary's Ascot is a leading Roman Catholic boarding school for girls aged between 11 and 18 years set in 55 acres in the heart of Berkshire. St Mary's Ascot is a leading Roman Catholic boarding school for girls aged between 11 and 18 years set in 55 acres of beautiful grounds in the heart of Berkshire. We are a friendly, stable and caring community, proud of our academic and extra-curricular achievements and dedicated to bringing out the full potential of each of our 380 pupils. It was named 2015 "Public School of the Year" at the annual Tatler Schools Awards

 Listings /  United Kingdom

We are called to challenge the minds, feed the souls, fire the imaginations and train the bodies of the girls and young women who are entrusted to us. Our school is the place where we grow their capacity for mutual and self-respect. Here, we prepare our girls to learn and develop confidently, to build key knowledge frameworks that will stand them in good stead for the rest of their lives, to play passionately and to give generously of themselves to each other and to the wider community. We provide opportunities that build character and encourage self-sufficiency. It is our mission to assist our girls to open themselves up to all possibilities, to explore their unique potentials and to identify their distinctive and various abilities so that they can become their best selves. We call it ‘unlocking potential and building brilliance’ and believe that each young girl has her own measure of brilliance that needs to be unleashed for her to lead a happy and fulfilling life. It is an objective to provide our girls with the tools of rigorous and passionate enquiry and self-expression so that they may know themselves in the world. Education is a serious business but schools should be places of fun, community and ‘soft landings’. We strive to support our girls through our systems of pastoral care and peer group mentoring. Our school chaplain and resident counsellors are key members of our staff. Here, your girls are encouraged to “stress-test” their ideas, to learn from their mistakes, to nurture their passions and grow their interests and talents. This is a school that is supportive of and interested in each individual, a school that challenges each girl to explore and discover her best self. We are a school that celebrates diversity, and holds the concept as a core value. We encourage diversity of interests, outlooks and ambitions and do not subscribe to ‘type’. We strive to be a happy, vibrant and representative community where each person is valued in the wider South African context. We acknowledge the complexity and inequity of our country’s history and our responsibility towards the creation of an equitable society. We are proud of our rich heritage as a school that opened its doors to all races and creeds in the Apartheid era and we embrace the future enthusiastically. As critical thinkers, creative problem solvers and compassionate human beings, our girls are prepared by their educational experience to become persuasive and courageous citizens, able to take their rightful places in the larger communities of city, nation and the world.

 Listings /  Africa

The South African Children’s Home was the first welfare institution established in South Africa. The SA Children’s Home was originally housed on Cape Town’s Long Street before moving to the suburb of Gardens in 1923. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Originally known as the ‘Orphan House’ it was founded in 1808 by Mrs Moller, a wealthy Dutch widow, who was assisted in this task by members of the Groote Kerk and the Evangelical Church, two of the oldest churches in South Africa. Mrs Moller dedicated much of her life to establishing the Children’s Home and upon her death she graciously donated the bulk of her estate to her beloved orphanage. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Now more than 200 years later, the Children’s Home continues its care for children by providing a secure, friendly, homely environment for its family of 44 boys and girls.

 Listings /  Africa

Rondebosch Boys’ High School was founded in 1897 in response to the pressing need for a boys’ school in the growing suburb of Rondebosch. From humble beginnings in a rented church hall with an initial enrolment of only eight boys, the High School has flourished under the leadership of ten Headmasters. A newly constructed building in Campground Road was occupied in 1898 and served through to 1948 when the much expanded facilities were opened next to the Canigou Estate – these are the High School buildings still in use today. The Campground building is now used exclusively by the Prep School. The first Headmaster, Mr Robert Ramage, initially accommodated a few boarders in his own home and in 1900 had the foresight to purchase the nearby Canigou homestead, which became the much loved boarding house. With Canigou came extensive grounds which have been developed into the sports fields on the school side of the Black River that runs through the premises. During the 1980s appeals were made to the then government for Rondebosch to be opened to all races. This permission was denied and it was only from 1990 that Rondebosch was allowed to do so. Headmaster Chris Murison, himself a former pupil of the school, said, ‘Rondebosch boys must emerge as often as possible from their comfortable cocoon, both to render the community service their privileged position makes them capable of and also, for their own sakes, to become more aware, from first-hand experience, of the world they live in.’ Generations of Rondebosch boys have been fortunate to fall under the tutelage and guidance of excellent teachers, mentors and coaches. These include Headmasters Sydney ‘Dad’ Mason and Wally Mears, masters Arthur Jayes and Tickey de Jager and the much revered Prof I de V ‘Tinkie’ Heyns among many other legendary and much loved figures. Mr Mason’s self-imposed task was keeping in contact with all Old Boys and staff who were serving during the two World Wars. He was instrumental in helping to raise funds for the building of the Rondebosch War Memorial Library – now the Reeler Music Centre – and the Memorial Hall, which is the symbolic and spiritual center of the School. Over time, the initial basic school facilities have been expanded and enhanced with further boarding in Mason House, the multi-purpose Mears Centre, two swimming and water polo pools, squash and tennis courts, cricket pavilion, Reeler Music Centre, Chris Murison Center (library and IT), Art Center, Technology Room, Carleton Lloyd Stand, hockey Astroturfs (shared with WPCC) and several pavilions. Most of these facilities were funded by former pupils in appreciation of the education which they received at Rondebosch. Old Boys of the school have excelled in varied pursuits in science, business, law, academia, culture and sport. Alan Cormack who was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1979 for the work he did in developing the CAT scan, Reverend Peter Storey served as President of the South African Council of Churches and was chaplain to Nelson Mandela while he was imprisoned on Robben Island, the world-famous painter Gregoire Boonzaier, Chief Justice Michael Corbett who inaugurated President Nelson Mandela, cartoonist Jonathan ‘Zapiro’ Shapiro, botanist Lyall Watson and almost 70 international sportsmen all attended Rondebosch.

 Listings /  Africa

Moglie, madre, nonna, Paola Thaon di Revel ama i fiori e la natura. L'eredità è il suo background. È cresciuta in una famiglia dove la disciplina militare era un dato di fatto, così come la voglia di divertirsi. Sei sorelle e un fratello, in una grande villa chiamata “Cimena”, dove molti sono venuti in visita: da Umberto I, agli americani colti, ai vicini Bruni Tedeschi sulla stessa collina. Una vita dedicata al marito, Franco Reviglio e ai tre figli con tanti spostamenti e viaggi, in tutto il mondo. Oggi, i sette nipoti e la casa di campagna, regalano giornate intensamente soddisfacenti. Wife, mother, grandmother, Paola Thaon di Revel loves flowers and nature. Heritage is her background. She grew up in a family where military discipline was a given, as well as the desire to have fun. Six sisters and one brother, in a large villa called “Cimena”, and everyone came to visit: from Umberto I, to educated Americans, to the Bruni Tedeschi neighbours on the same hill. A life dedicated to her husband, Franco Reviglio and the three children with many moves and travels, all over the world. Today, the seven grandchildren and country house, make for intensely satisfying days.

 Partners /  Greater Europe

North London Collegiate School was founded in April 1850 by Frances Mary Buss in the family home at 46 Camden Street, Camden Town. All the family assisted with the school including her brother Septimus and her father, R.W. Buss, who illustrated Dickens' novels and whose paintings now hang in the Buss Room, in the Old House at Canons. In 1871, Miss Buss also founded Camden School for Girls for families with more modest incomes. You can find out more about her and the headmistresses who followed her in the dedicated sections below. The school, as it grew bigger, moved to Camden Road and then to Sandall Road. The site at Canons in Edgware was bought in 1929 but the school did not move there fully until May 1940. You can site in its dedicated page. North London Collegiate School is a top independent day school for girls aged 4-18. Since its founding in 1850, generations of girls have received an ambitious academic education and formed a bond with NLCS, which lasts forever. We provide a carefully judged blend of support and challenge, a friendly and warm atmosphere, glorious facilities and extensive extra-curricular activities.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Mandy Shrimpton is the quintessential people’s person. Mandy believes that success is measured by the quality of our human-relationships rather than the results we manifest through sheer will. Mandy firmly established herself as the heart of the non-profit organisation that she co-founded and ran with her adoring husband for 17 years. Mandy loves walking in nature with her family, hugging trees, and preserving the environment. She also enjoys being creative and is particularly fond of painting flowers. As a very happily married and devoted mother to four children, Mandy has cultivated a deep appreciation for the culinary arts and relishes the spare moments she gets to watch her favourite cooking shows. This initiative reflects how Mandy sees the world, helping to create positive synergy. Fostering unity and courteous community, building partner relationships and motivating affiliates. Born and bred in Africa, Mandy understands the concept of Ubuntu. I am, because we are. Together we can make the world a better place. Using her skills and experience to make a difference. Helping others see through the fog of new technologies, avoid common marketing mistakes and develop better business strategies. With a subtle blend of motherhood and effective project management, Mandy is the perfect professional partner, to show others the merits of this initiative. Shining a light on the path to prosperity, while not losing our footing in family values and humble humanity. Sharing is caring, while enriching ourselves spiritually and materially. We cannot give freely, if we don't have. "Sometimes the world makes more sense, through the eyes of a mother. Using protective instinct and family fortitude, to help one another." ~ Mandy Shrimpton

 Partners /  Africa

King’s was founded by royal charter in 1829 as the junior department of King's College London, and was originally located in Strand. During the early Victorian period, the school grew in numbers and reputation. Teachers included the artist John Sell Cotman and the poet Gabriele Rossetti, who taught Italian (his son, the famous Dante Gabriel Rossetti, joined King’s in 1837). King's was progressive in its curriculum and appointed its first science master in 1855, at a time where very few schools taught science. The first head master, John Major, served the school between 1831 and 1866, and during this time 99 King's pupils appear in the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1897, King's moved to its present site in Wimbledon and the junior school opened on the same campus in 1912. In World War I, many letters were written to the school, including some from the Battle of the Somme. During World War II, the Great Hall was damaged by bomb shrapnel; some of the damage can still be seen today. The archive collects and preserves records relating to the school’s history from its foundation to the present day. The archive is a fantastic resource, and through the hard work of our wonderful volunteers, provides a fascinating insight into the rich heritage of King's. In 2019, it was renamed the Bryan Stokes Archive, in recognition of the ex-teacher and long-serving school archivist who was a member of the King's community for over 60 years.

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Over 5.7 million South Africans are HIV positive and of the country’s estimated 3.7 million orphans, about half have lost one or both parents to AIDS, while over 150,000 children are believed to be living in child-headed households. The statistics can be utterly overwhelming… But God has called us to be the solution and each of us has something we can use to play a positive role. Some will be able to give financially, others may feel called to adopt, still others to volunteer or pray. When each of us uses what we have in our hands, we can make a difference. Through Kibwe we’re currently focusing on… We have three community-based foster homes, in Kayamandi (Stellenbosch), Franschhoek and Somerset West. We’re also in the process of starting a new home in Piketberg. Living in a small family unit with a caring foster parent is a reasonable alternative for children who can’t be cared for by their biological families. They have a foster family to support and care for them and we hope that one day they’ll either be reunited with their biological families, or failing that, that we’ve provided them with the necessary grounding to lead happy, successful adult lives. As Christians, expanding our families through adoption is a natural response to our faith. As more and more members of Shofar Christian Church are adopting and fostering children, there’s a growing need for information and support for those who are embarking on this journey. As the NGO mandated with orphan care within the church, we’ve begun hosting info sessions for anyone interested in finding out more about adoption and fostering, covering topics like our Biblical mandate to care for orphans and the basics of the process, as well as testimonies from families who’ve already adopted and fostered.

 Listings /  Africa

Hope and Homes for Children was the creation of two extraordinary individuals who believed that every child had the right to grow up in a loving family. Today, the organisation that Mark and Caroline Cook started at their kitchen table in Wiltshire in 1994, is at the forefront of a growing global movement to eliminate the institutional care of children. Our mission is to be the catalyst for the global elimination of institutional care for children and our vision is a world in which children no longer suffer institutional care. In 1994, Mark Cook, a retired British Army officer, read about the plight of a group of children, struggling to survive in Sarajevo’s main orphanage at the height of the Bosnian War. He told his wife Caroline and within weeks the couple had boarded a plane to the city to see what they could do to help. When they first set eyes on the Bjelave orphanage the building was in a terrible state. It had sustained hits from mortars and heavy weapons in its exposed position on top of one of the city’s hills. The teenagers who lived there had been left to run wild, living a semi-feral existence in the ruined building and scavenging food and supplies out in the streets. The babies were down in the basement, crammed inside the only warm room in the building. The Cooks visited the orphanage for a week and promised the children that they would find a way to rebuild their home. “In order to keep that promise, we decided to start our own charity to provide homes for orphans of war or disaster”, Mark says. “We wanted to give them hope, hence Hope and Homes for Children.” The Cooks set up an office in a converted hay barn on a farm near their home in Wiltshire and this site remains the headquarters of Hope and Homes for Children today. In the early days, Mark and Caroline’s plan was to create a worldwide network of small, well-run orphanages but, by listening to the children that they were trying to help, they soon realised that they were on the wrong track. It did not matter what race, colour or creed the children were, or whether they were living in an orphanage, on the streets on in the sewers, whenever they were asked what they really wanted, their answer was always the same, “Please, please find me a family.” Mark asked one small boy on the streets of Khartoum what he thought a family and a home were and his answer was “Love”. That response was to have a defining influence on the future focus of Hope and Homes for Children. “We had presumed that what these children needed was food, a roof over their heads, a safe place to sleep and an education”, Caroline says, “but the children themselves guided us to their heart of our mission – they desperately wanted and needed to be loved. “Over the years we have visited numerous orphanages in many countries. Some were awful and smelled so bad that we felt sick and wanted to leave; others were better, being reasonably equipped and staffed. But the one thing we never found in any orphanage was the feeling of unconditional love that is at the heart of a caring family. “Love became the key to our work and we have quite unashamedly focused on and talked about it ever since.”

 Listings /  United Kingdom

Home of Hope has evolved into an organisation that takes care of children, provides education to children with special needs and helps them to become productive and responsible members of the community, continuing support into adulthood through a working care farm and skills development opportunities. Home of Hope was founded in August 2005 by Eleanor Brook, who inspired by her faith having adopted children of her own and having experienced life in a children’s home herself , wanted to harness her experience to provide support for other children in need of care. The organisation started as an interim ‘place of safety’ for children who were abandoned in dustbins to die, violently abused, raped, hungry and neglected due to poverty, infected with HIV and AIDS and those who were born bearing the effects of excessive drug and alcohol abuse by their mothers during pregnancy. During that time it was found that many of the babies leaving the care of Home of Hope would return after a couple of months. Because of this, Home of Hope began to research the possible reasons. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder was discovered and many of the characteristics of FASD were found to be present in the children. The organisation began to look deeper into this disorder, but could not find many resources, support systems or solutions. South Africa has the highest rate of FASD in the world where approx. 70 000 children are born every year suffering from this condition. 85% of children with FASD are not raised by their birth parents (usually they are in foster care or children’s homes) and come from families that are often unstable with the child being in greater risk of physical and sexual abuse or neglect. Based on the challenges in caring for children affected by FASD, Home of Hope began to evolve to provide a long-term solution for our children, as well as services for other families that care for children affected by FASD. As the organisation grew and developed, we were able to respond to a bigger need – to provide a broader and more effective service for the protection of children – more than just that of interim places of safety.

 Listings /  Africa

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