Africa

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Africa

DHS leads boys on their journey to become men and take their place in the world. We have a lineage of well rounded young men reaching back 155 years. Each boy is as unique as his journey, and DHS is proud to be part of the making of both history and the future. More than just a high school, DHS becomes a way of life for many of its learners, to which its 7000 strong Old Boys network is testament. Embracing a heritage of excellence, DHS is shaping the future by producing young men who excel in all areas of life – Academic, Sporting, Cultural and Leadership. In each of these areas, we offer unsurpassed facilities; Our award winning media centre, iPad learning centre, fully functional theatre, indoor cricket centre, music school and Maths & Science centre being just some of the highlights. The School has provided a safe, clean, caring and well-organised school climate that has always been conducive to learning. DHS offers an ongoing assessment system that supports good instruction. And it has always striven for high levels of parent and community involvement and support. In the sporting arena, DHS has excelled. Its learners have always ranked among the best young sportsmen in the city and province. Many of them have gone on to become leading figures on the national sporting scene. Blackmore House, our boarding establishment, is located on the school grounds and provides a home from home for up to 130 boys. In 2016 DHS celebrated its rich history spanning 150 years.

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At Durban Girls’ College not only do we teach our girls to look at the bigger picture of life, but also to realise their place and potential within it. Our school breathes a sense of confidence and curiosity into young girls so that they feel empowered to take their stance as independent and courageous women of our society. We teach for life – not for the classroom. A girl’s unique educational journey into womanhood starts with us. Established in 1877, Durban Girls’ College is a world-class South African school located high above the city on Durban’s Berea. DGC is an independent IEB school for girls from Grade 00 to Grade 12, with weekly boarding from Grade 7. The founders are still remembered in our Founders’ Day service each year, and the six school houses bear their names – Churchill, Cottam, Greenacre, Hunter, Palmer and Rutherford. In 1905, DGC moved to Musgrave Road, its present site, which was donated by Sir Benjamin Greenacre. The beautiful original school building is a monument to the spirit of excellence in which the school was established. Over time, the spacious campus has been extended and developed and the present pupils enjoy world-class academic, cultural and sporting facilities and equipment.

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Seed of Hope began in just one room of a disused building on the rural outskirts of Durban. In 2003, founders Derek and Heather Liebenberg and a small core of volunteers felt the call to respond to the Aids crisis and its impact on families in KwaZulu Natal. At that time, the HIV pandemic was unchecked, as anti-retroviral medications were not yet widely available. The Liebenbergs launched an afternoon drop-in program for children who would otherwise be unattended and at risk of drifting into mischief, gangs or other dangerous behaviour. The classes were fun, teaching games, songs, crafts, Bible lessons and life skills. Soon dozens of children were attending daily and the program had been given a name – Simunye Time. Simunye means “we are one” in isiZulu. In the following months, the childrenʼs program gave birth to strategies to help people access basic health care, a support group for HIV- positive community members, and a small sewing class for unemployed women. Many of our clients were deeply affected by the HIV pandemic and suffered heartbreaking losses. It was a time when hope was scarce in the community of Bhekulwandle. Our vision to equip local community members to overcome challenges was birthed through the experiences and resilience of these friends and neighbours.

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The Surfer Kids is a registered Non-Profit Organisation 136-987 NPO. Our mission is to "empower marginalised youths through surfing". THE SURFER KIDS CORE SURF PROGRAMME has been offering free surf lessons to the marginalised youths in the Southern Cape of South Africa since November 2010. Our Core Surfing Programme is based at Diaz Beach in Mossel Bay. The primary focus of our CORE SURF PROGRAMME is introducing young children to surfing. Surfing isn't otherwise normally practised in Friemersheim, or any of the other surrounding marginalised communities. The children are introduced to surfing as a healthy way of having fun! As the children grow within the programme they are encouraged to progress. To paddle to the back-line and surf bigger and better waves. This is no easy task, as anyone who's ever tried surfing will know. Learning to paddle and catch waves takes a lot of hard work. But the reward of riding waves is one of the best feelings a human being can experience !!! This allows for the unique medium of surfing to teach one of the most fundamental and empowering life skills of all: Life may be full of limitations. BUT, by working towards a goal, with commitment, one can accomplish incredible things. Despite our limitations, whatever they may be, as long as we have great goals, if we're prepared to work for it, we can achieve what we've only ever dreamt of. And more. This is the message of hope and empowerment around which we structure our entire programme.

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Heart-to-Heart Care Centre aims to bring life, hope and opportunity to children made orphaned or vulnerable in South Africa, by HIV/AIDS, TB and poverty. Heart-to-Heart believes that together WE CAN change the destiny of children one child at a time. We are passionate about providing Holistic Care, Psychosocial Support, Education and Empowerment to Children, Youth and Women. We strive to see a self sustaining community. We are tackling poverty that is centered around dignity and not dependence. Walking alongside women facing unplanned pregnancies. This team is dedicated to Care for and Support Teenage Girls and Women who find themselves in a crisis due to an unplanned pregnancy. Our aim is to help teens and women achieve their full potential in life. 70% of children between ages 8-10 years old will not be able to speak, write or read English by the time they are 13 years old. Only 50% of them will go on to write final exams in high school. This tugged at our hearts and therefor the Literacy centre was birthed! Where volunteers along with our Education Coordinator will asses and walk alongside these young ones to make sure they know they are not just a statistic on a board but a life that counts! Together we can transform lives through literacy!

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Milkwood Primary School is an English medium school situated at the Point in Mossel Bay, overlooking the sea. They serve a cross section of the local community and are one of the most culturally diverse schools in the region. In 1992 numerous concerns resulted in the drawing up of a petition to start an English Language Primary School. It happened quickly, aided by the fast growing numbers caused by the development of Mossgass. The first principal, Bill Innes, arrived full of enthusiasm in April 1993, with his surfboard and motorbike, to be followed later by his beautiful wife and two freckle-faced sons. The focus and tone of our discipline is positive and encouraging. However, this needs to be balanced with the reality that all children blossom in an environment where there is structure and routine. Learners need to know that there are consequences to actions and certain actions could have serious consequences. In this environment, the child learns responsibility and respect for authority.

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Point High School in Mossel Bay Western Cape South Africa is an established school that has been in the service of the community of Mossel Bay since 1921 with the aim of developing the child as a whole. The school is a public school. The teaching norms and requirements are determined by the Western Cape Education Department. The interests of parents are managed at local level by a Governing Body, the majority of whose members are elected by parents from their own ranks. Point High School has the services of a dedicated, energetic and fully qualified staff. The school is housed in a modern building that has the most beautiful views in the country, in addition to the usual organized sports tours, leadership camps and educational excursions are regularly undertaken. An active and dynamic Parent-Teacher Association makes a valuable contribution to various projects in the school.

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It all started in 1999 with a vision to create a space where people could live and learn together in an ecologically sustainable environment. We share the story through the people that were part of shaping it. In 2019 the Sustainability Institute is celebrating its 20-year anniversary. We reflect back on this amazing journey, and share our story as told by some of the people that made all of this possible. The Lynedoch Eco-Village is a mixed community organised around a child-centered learning precinct. It strives to be a working example of a liveable ecologically designed urban system that is self-sustainable. Above all else, the Lynedoch Eco-Village provides a safe space where South Africans from all backgrounds can live in peace with each other and in harmony with nature. In our fifth video, we share some reflections from residents. The design of the Sustainability Institute was done by keeping in mind how available local resources could be incorporated into the infrastructure, how existing infrastructure could be reused and how the natural elements could be used to cool and heat the buildings. Take a look at how it all came together, as explained by the original architect, Gita Goven. The SI is committed to putting children at the heart of what we do. Education is a right for all children and our core work focuses on enabling access to quality education for children from the Lynedoch Valley. This is our third video which focuses on the various programmes related to the children and youth. You will get a glimpse into the Lynedoch Children’s House, SPARK Primary school, the Youth Hub programme and Lynedoch United Football Club. The Sustainability Institute hosts programmes designed to challenge conventional thinking and open minds to new ways of doing and approaching the known while incorporating the entire space at the Institute as part of the learning experience. Take a look at the different educational programmes we have been offering since 2003. Food brings people together. At the SI we not only prepare delicious locally sourced organic food, but our food garden provides fresh vegetables and herbs used in daily meals for the children, students, and guests. We reconnect people with where food comes from, and our food garden and approach to food serves as a beautiful living-learning environment. When the Institute started in 1999, there were not many trees and wildlife around. To restore the natural ecosystem and to create a green space protected from any buildings or development, a piece of land was put aside for an indigenous woodland. Over the past 16 years our students, guided by the vision of our woodland custodian Bryce Anderson and Fumanekile Qhinga, have helped to plant trees and shrubs that have grown into this beautiful, peaceful woodland. Today it is flourishing and what was once a barren space, is growing into a dense forest of trees and shrubs. The woodlands provide an opportunity for solitude and connection to nature.

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Home of Hope has evolved into an organisation that takes care of children, provides education to children with special needs and helps them to become productive and responsible members of the community, continuing support into adulthood through a working care farm and skills development opportunities. Home of Hope was founded in August 2005 by Eleanor Brook, who inspired by her faith having adopted children of her own and having experienced life in a children’s home herself , wanted to harness her experience to provide support for other children in need of care. The organisation started as an interim ‘place of safety’ for children who were abandoned in dustbins to die, violently abused, raped, hungry and neglected due to poverty, infected with HIV and AIDS and those who were born bearing the effects of excessive drug and alcohol abuse by their mothers during pregnancy. During that time it was found that many of the babies leaving the care of Home of Hope would return after a couple of months. Because of this, Home of Hope began to research the possible reasons. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder was discovered and many of the characteristics of FASD were found to be present in the children. The organisation began to look deeper into this disorder, but could not find many resources, support systems or solutions. South Africa has the highest rate of FASD in the world where approx. 70 000 children are born every year suffering from this condition. 85% of children with FASD are not raised by their birth parents (usually they are in foster care or children’s homes) and come from families that are often unstable with the child being in greater risk of physical and sexual abuse or neglect. Based on the challenges in caring for children affected by FASD, Home of Hope began to evolve to provide a long-term solution for our children, as well as services for other families that care for children affected by FASD. As the organisation grew and developed, we were able to respond to a bigger need – to provide a broader and more effective service for the protection of children – more than just that of interim places of safety.

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Over 5.7 million South Africans are HIV positive and of the country’s estimated 3.7 million orphans, about half have lost one or both parents to AIDS, while over 150,000 children are believed to be living in child-headed households. The statistics can be utterly overwhelming… But God has called us to be the solution and each of us has something we can use to play a positive role. Some will be able to give financially, others may feel called to adopt, still others to volunteer or pray. When each of us uses what we have in our hands, we can make a difference. Through Kibwe we’re currently focusing on… We have three community-based foster homes, in Kayamandi (Stellenbosch), Franschhoek and Somerset West. We’re also in the process of starting a new home in Piketberg. Living in a small family unit with a caring foster parent is a reasonable alternative for children who can’t be cared for by their biological families. They have a foster family to support and care for them and we hope that one day they’ll either be reunited with their biological families, or failing that, that we’ve provided them with the necessary grounding to lead happy, successful adult lives. As Christians, expanding our families through adoption is a natural response to our faith. As more and more members of Shofar Christian Church are adopting and fostering children, there’s a growing need for information and support for those who are embarking on this journey. As the NGO mandated with orphan care within the church, we’ve begun hosting info sessions for anyone interested in finding out more about adoption and fostering, covering topics like our Biblical mandate to care for orphans and the basics of the process, as well as testimonies from families who’ve already adopted and fostered.

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Heaven’s Nest was established in 2004 and is an emergency foster facility for young children in need. Located in Cape Town, South Africa, we care for up to 18 children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years old, offering them a secure, loving home until they can be re-united with their families, fostered or adopted. Heaven’s Nest is a project of the Church of St Francis of Assisi in Strandfontein and the Fikelela Aids Project. Many of our children have experienced neglect and abuse which have left deep scars. So, as well as providing love, good food, basic education and health care, we also provide counselling and play therapy to all our children. The Confidentiality Clause in our Constitution, protects children from having their HIV status revealed, therefore we generally provide care to all “Children in Need” Since inception, more than 1350 children have passed through our doors with many of them being placed in improved conditions with family members, foster or adoptive parents. Heaven’s Nest has forged a link with child welfare and social service and accommodates approximately 14 -18 children at any time. We sometimes exceeds this limited to accommodate siblings. Children who are accommodated range from the age of 6 months to 8 years of age. Children placed with us have been legally declared to be in need of care and are waiting for social workers to further investigate their circumstances of need – initially 6 weeks, or they are waiting to be placed with appointed adoptive or foster parents and the process takes 6 weeks. Alternatively they are waiting for adoptive parents to be appointed this process is indeterminate. Many of the children however stay here for much longer than 6 weeks. Some even stay as long as two to four years. The programmes undertaken in these session help in the upliftment of self-esteem, confidence and ensure that these children are able to become active, mature, productive adolescence. In our 16 years of experience we have discovered that many of the children placed at the home have not been exposed to the most basic form of education with many experiencing difficulties. Their mind have been deprived of the right to basic education with which to stimulate their minds. With great success Heaven’s Nest has been able to be in the service of aiding children for the past sixteen years having been established in 2004.

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Heatherdale Children’s Home began in 1929. Since that time it has evolved and re-focussed its vision to be relevant to the changing world of young people. We are a Level 2 Child and Youth Care Centre accommodating children in need of care. Heatherdale Children’s Home had humble beginnings, operating out of what was an old farmhouse on a spacious piece of ground made available to the church by the late Rev. T.E. Marsh (who had founded Heatherdale’s sister institution, Marsh Memorial Homes, 28 years earlier), and initially catering only for orphaned “coloured” girls. As time went by, the needs of the community changed and Heatherdale responded to these needs establishing itself as a place of safety for all children at risk from abuse, abandonment or neglect. Heatherdale Children’s Home is a level 2 Child and Youth Care Centre in Athlone, Cape Town. It operates under the auspices of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa. For many years Heatherdale has provided a safe space for vulnerable and at-risk children at risk through its residential programme. We have accommodated up to fifty (50) children, those whose homes are beset with financial difficulties, drug and alcohol problems and/or physical abuse, and who have suffered emotional trauma as a result. Through therapeutic and development programmes Heatherdale has addressed each child’s trauma and equipped them to return to their community and to a normal, healthy and independent life. For the past number of years Heatherdale has accommodated up to fifty children, 25 boys and 24 girls, aged between 5 and 18 years of age. The children are placed in our care by the Commissioner of the Children’s Court, with a social worker testifying that their home environment places them at risk. We offer a range of comprehensive programmes that encompass areas such as life skills training, therapeutic services sporting activities, spiritual development and educational support.

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The South African Children’s Home was the first welfare institution established in South Africa. The SA Children’s Home was originally housed on Cape Town’s Long Street before moving to the suburb of Gardens in 1923. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Originally known as the ‘Orphan House’ it was founded in 1808 by Mrs Moller, a wealthy Dutch widow, who was assisted in this task by members of the Groote Kerk and the Evangelical Church, two of the oldest churches in South Africa. Mrs Moller dedicated much of her life to establishing the Children’s Home and upon her death she graciously donated the bulk of her estate to her beloved orphanage. Forty-five years later a modern Children’s Home was erected on the same site and this is where the Children’s Home still stands today. Now more than 200 years later, the Children’s Home continues its care for children by providing a secure, friendly, homely environment for its family of 44 boys and girls.

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Our community in Khayelitsha is afflicted by the largest HIV/Aids epidemic in the world, an increasing number of orphaned/vulnerable children, and an unemployment that stands at a staggering 54.1% or higher. The vision of Baphumelele is to provide a temporary shelter for vulnerable/orphaned children and young adults with chronic diseases and HIV/Aids, and to provide skills development for the unemployed, early childhood care, alleviation of poverty, and healthcare information to the community in Khayelitsha and surroundings, so that the lives of everyone we touch can become more productive and accepted individuals who make a difference within society. In 1989, Rosalia Mashale “Mama Rosie” to those around her, a trained primary school teacher, moved from the Eastern Cape toKhayelitsha in the Western Cape Province. Rosie was disturbed to see young children going through the rubbish dump in search for food while their parents were away during the day, either at work or in search of work. She responded by taking children into her home, and together with a group of women from the community, began looking after these unsupervised children. After the first week, 36 children had joined their charge. The name given to this project was Baphumelele (pronounced: ba-poo-meh-leh-leh), a Xhosa word meaning “you have progressed”. From these humble beginnings Baphumelele Educare Centre was founded. Today the centre is an established community crèche and Grade R (preschool) caring for roughly 250 children aged three months to six years. While the Educare Centre had developed a reputation for looking after children, Rosie also felt a calling to reach out to orphaned children in the community. To that end, Baphumelele Children’s Home was created as a place of safety for abandoned, abused, neglected or orphaned children, many of whom have been affected by the HIV/Aids pandemic or have HIV/Aids themselves. Through the hard work, determination, and help of the community and friends overseas, Baphumelele has developed into a thriving community project over the years. In addition to the Children’s Home and Educare Centre, Baphumelele has expanded to include the Adult Respite Care Centre, Child Respite Centre, Hospice in the Home, Child Headed Households, Fountain of Hope, and Rosie’s Bakery/Sewing Project. Mama Rosie is a visionary paradigm-shifter whose leadership and vision continue to grow and shape Baphumelele today.

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At Christine Revell Children’s Home we provide full-time care for up to 49 babies and children from birth to five years of age who have been referred to us by social workers and placed here by order of a children’s court. The children are either neglected, abandoned, abused, orphaned and are accepted at the home irrespective of HIV status, race or gender. We strive to create a warm, friendly and homely environment, but our ultimate aim is to re-unite a child with its parents or the extended family should circumstances permit. Children are also placed into foster care with suitable families in the communities and when the proper legal channels have been followed children can also be adopted. These decisions are always taken with the full involvement of our social worker, the social worker who referred the child to us, the family and children’s courts. Many of the children who arrive at our Home have not had the chance to grow and develop normally. A healthy and nutritious diet, suitable exercise and the mental development of our children are therefore of great importance. With this in mind we run a crèche weekdays from 08:00 to 11:45 where we develop the children mentally, physically, emotionally and socially.

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The Durbanville Children's Home opened its doors in 1883 and is celebrating 130 years of care to children in need in 2013. We have 144 children aged from 2 to 18 at our home and are a non-profit, church based residential care home who looks after children in need of care from all communities of the Cape Peninsula. We are recognised as a model for child and youth care in a therapeutic milieu. The Children‘s Home receive 32% subsidy from the Government, therefore we are very dependent on local and foreign communities for funds and donations.

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Marsh Memorial Homes nurtures children and transforms lives, by providing short term care for children who have experienced abuse, neglect or abandonment. Our programmes strive to rehabilitate and re unite children with their families or communities of origin, having developed in them the skill necessary for them to develop into confident productive and responsible adults. This work of transformation begins with Marsh Memorial Homes providing a safe, stable and loving environment for the children in our care. The environment coupled with an intentional life skills programme, along with multi-disciplinary therapeutic support and counselling aims to assist children to find healing, rebuild their self-respect and confidence thus ensuring that when they leave our care they are equipped to achieve their dreams. All children in our care come to us via the children’s court system, the majority have families. Ultimately our goal is to see all the children happily reunited with their rehabilitated families. In order to achieve this we work in partnership with the Department of Social Development and a number of Welfare organisations who focus on assisting the families in their local communities and are committed to reuniting families if at all possible. The roots of Marsh Memorial Homes are to be found in the generosity of William Marsh. William Marsh Born in 1822 in Walsall in Staffordshire, moved to the Cape colony with his wife Frances, and founded a hardware firm in Cape Town that became extremely successful. Their only son, Thomas Edward (always known by his second name, after his father’s older brother), was born in Cape Town in 1854. After matriculating from the South African College, Edward worked in his father’s business for seven years before responding to a call to the ministry and going to Richmond Methodist College in London to train as a minister. On the 28 August 1901 the Marsh Memorial Homes officially opened their doors on the 12 January 1903 when the first children were admitted. Much has changed over the years, the estate is considerably smaller with portions having been sold to raise funds, expropriated for the building of roads and leased to the Woodside Village Trust. So today on a smaller property the good work started by the Reverend Edward Marsh continues in the present Marsh Memorial Homes, a multicultural child and youth care facility under the auspices of The Methodist Church of Southern Africa.

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It is our vision that: “EVERY CHILD HAS THE RIGHT TO GROW UP IN A LOVING AND RESPONSIBLE FAMILY” Founded as a family-run organisation, at the dawn of South African democracy in 1993, TLC Children's Home is now a board governed, fully B-BBEE compliant, registered Not-For-Profit Child and Youth Care Center (CYCC) with the Department of Social Development. We focus on providing quality attachment based, trauma informed care to the little ones in our home to best address the pre-existing and/or inutero trauma every child invariably comes to us with. We also put significant effort into championing for the right of each child to be placed into a loving and responsible family as rapidly as possible. Our purpose is to provide quality care and nurture to the vulnerable babies and children that are welcomed into our home. We undertake to care for and nurture these babies and children on a full-time basis, within a family-modeled, homely environment, whilst painstakingly pursing their rapid, responsible placement into loving forever families of their own. Our motivation and conviction is that every child has the right to a loving, caring family and that no child should be left in an orphanage. At present TLC cares for up to 34 babies all of which come to us under the age of 3 years upon admission. Since our inception in 1993, over 900 babies have come to our home. We believe that by providing quality, attachment based care to the little ones in our home and placing them into loving, permanent families, we will see the long-term benefits of providing a quality upbringing to these vulnerable children of our nation.

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Crawford International has been a part of South African education for over 20 years. The schools that make up the Crawford collection constitute the largest single private school organisation in South Africa. Crawford International boasts twenty-two of the top schools in South Africa. Together they have challenged every traditional and conventional practice in education in our country. Their academic success is proven. Crawford International is a trailblazer in innovative and forward-thinking education. Every student is acknowledged and offered the opportunity to excel. The child-centred approach inherent in every school ensures that students examine and realise their own potential. Crawford International offers an academic foundation of the highest order and ensures that each student is a fully-rounded person. Cultural success is a cornerstone of every school, while sport is enjoyed by every sports-loving student and community involvement is celebrated by every civic-minded citizen.

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Eden Schools were established in Gauteng over 30 years ago. The Chief Executive of Eden, Mr Allan Zulberg, co-founded Eden in 1974. He played a leading role in the establishment of Midrand University and Educor. He was an executive director of Educor. He also served as Chief Executive of King David Schools for a time. Mr Zulberg taught Mathematics and Physical Science for many years, and also served as headmaster of Eden Lyndhurst. Eden Schools operate in Lyndhurst, Randburg and Durban. Its head office is in Lyndhurst, Johannesburg. Mr Joe Khouri is Chief Operating Officer, an educator, past principal and lecturer at Wits University. Mr Allan Fehler is the group's Financial Director.[citation needed] In 2007 Eden opened in Durban. The school was previously managed by Crawfordschools. The school operates a Pre-Primary, Preparatory, Middle School and College High School in Glenmore.

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The Bloemhof Girls' High School, located along the Eerste River in Stellenbosch, is the oldest Afrikaans medium school for girls in South Africa and has been named the best high school with Afrikaans as the medium of instruction in the Western Cape since 2017. In 2021, Bloemhof will be named the best Afrikaans medium high school in the country - a great honor! Bloemhof is synonymous with excellent academic results and learners who bridge the gap between school and university with ease. High-performance sports, professional coaches and world-class facilities help our learners to compete against the best in SA. We offer a wide range of cultural activities that hone social skills and regularly enjoy exposure at the national level.

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Durban Girls High School was founded in 1882. Our academic focus is based on the strong work ethic of both staff and learners. This is enhanced by state of the art technology and fully equipped venues which provide outstanding teaching resources. Cultural opportunities offer learners a platform from which to develop self-expression, creativity and explore their own ideas in a supportive environment while service activities reinforce the values of empathy and community. We offer a comprehensive sport programme that encompasses both the competitive and wellness elements of physical activity. We view sport as essential for the development of health, self-discipline and team work. We offer a range of diverse leadership opportunities, offering learners the chance to build their skills and put them into practice.

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Rondebosch Boys’ High School was founded in 1897 in response to the pressing need for a boys’ school in the growing suburb of Rondebosch. From humble beginnings in a rented church hall with an initial enrolment of only eight boys, the High School has flourished under the leadership of ten Headmasters. A newly constructed building in Campground Road was occupied in 1898 and served through to 1948 when the much expanded facilities were opened next to the Canigou Estate – these are the High School buildings still in use today. The Campground building is now used exclusively by the Prep School. The first Headmaster, Mr Robert Ramage, initially accommodated a few boarders in his own home and in 1900 had the foresight to purchase the nearby Canigou homestead, which became the much loved boarding house. With Canigou came extensive grounds which have been developed into the sports fields on the school side of the Black River that runs through the premises. During the 1980s appeals were made to the then government for Rondebosch to be opened to all races. This permission was denied and it was only from 1990 that Rondebosch was allowed to do so. Headmaster Chris Murison, himself a former pupil of the school, said, ‘Rondebosch boys must emerge as often as possible from their comfortable cocoon, both to render the community service their privileged position makes them capable of and also, for their own sakes, to become more aware, from first-hand experience, of the world they live in.’ Generations of Rondebosch boys have been fortunate to fall under the tutelage and guidance of excellent teachers, mentors and coaches. These include Headmasters Sydney ‘Dad’ Mason and Wally Mears, masters Arthur Jayes and Tickey de Jager and the much revered Prof I de V ‘Tinkie’ Heyns among many other legendary and much loved figures. Mr Mason’s self-imposed task was keeping in contact with all Old Boys and staff who were serving during the two World Wars. He was instrumental in helping to raise funds for the building of the Rondebosch War Memorial Library – now the Reeler Music Centre – and the Memorial Hall, which is the symbolic and spiritual center of the School. Over time, the initial basic school facilities have been expanded and enhanced with further boarding in Mason House, the multi-purpose Mears Centre, two swimming and water polo pools, squash and tennis courts, cricket pavilion, Reeler Music Centre, Chris Murison Center (library and IT), Art Center, Technology Room, Carleton Lloyd Stand, hockey Astroturfs (shared with WPCC) and several pavilions. Most of these facilities were funded by former pupils in appreciation of the education which they received at Rondebosch. Old Boys of the school have excelled in varied pursuits in science, business, law, academia, culture and sport. Alan Cormack who was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1979 for the work he did in developing the CAT scan, Reverend Peter Storey served as President of the South African Council of Churches and was chaplain to Nelson Mandela while he was imprisoned on Robben Island, the world-famous painter Gregoire Boonzaier, Chief Justice Michael Corbett who inaugurated President Nelson Mandela, cartoonist Jonathan ‘Zapiro’ Shapiro, botanist Lyall Watson and almost 70 international sportsmen all attended Rondebosch.

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Willowridge High is a young school with young ideas and many talented young people who have excelled in an environment which has nurtured enthusiasm, friendship and a pioneering spirit. We have built this ethos on the lives of four prominent South Africans who were associated with Pretoria East and the early development of the Transvaal. Our four school houses are named after them and our house badges are extracts from their original family crests. The first of these, in historical sequence, Harry Struben, is remembered as a pioneer on the gold fields. In 1860, he started a transport business between the old ZAR capital and Natal. With the profits from this business, he bought a farm, The Willows, at that time far to the east of Pretoria. As early as the start of 1985 a Vigilance Committee was elected at a meeting of prospective parents. Having been named the watchdogs, they monitored the progress of the new school, while the buildings started taking shape on the site that once had been a farm. It was due to their efforts that the school cottage and the trees, which give our schools its restful country atmosphere, were saved from the bulldozer. The Committee’s activities were, however, also directed at creating an ethos for their new school and establishing a fundamental philosophy. Our school opened its doors on Wednesday 7 January 1987 to welcome the first 187 pupils in Forms One and Two. During the first term the name Willowridge High School became official and a badge needed to be designed.

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Curro was established in 1998 and is the leading for-profit independent school provider in southern Africa. It develops, acquires and manages independent schools for learners from three months to Grade 12. We believe the purpose of education is to empower every person with the opportunity to achieve their potential as individuals and members of society. We further believe that education is the cornerstone in the development of quality leaders and responsible citizens who will positively impact the economy, environment and society. Our vision is to make independent school education accessible to more learners throughout southern Africa. Our value system is based on four pillars: Child-friendliness, Positive discipline, Christian ethos (ethics and morals), Creative thinking. Curro created a balanced educational space in which learners can learn and grow, as encompassed in the name of the group, ‘Curro’, which in Latin means 'I run'. Within the education context it can be interpreted as: ‘I learn at my own learning pace and according to my own aptitude, attitude and talents.’ These principles form the foundation of Curro’s ethical standards, which are included in the group’s code of ethics, codes of conduct, good citizenship and related policies. South African education has seen many transformations since 1994. However, despite a substantial allocation of the national budget to education, the increasing demand for high quality schools and teachers remains insatiable. Despite making progress in creating equal opportunities for learners, government still faces great challenges in providing education at an acceptable standard. Understandably, their efforts are targeted where the situation is most dire. However, this creates a vacuum in terms of facilities and standards at the lower to middle of the market, as well as for new campuses in the more affluent areas. This has led to the private sector increasingly playing its part. Section 29 of the South African Constitution enshrines and protects the valuable role of independent schools in this regard.  Against this background, we aim to develop a large number of independent schools across South Africa and the rest of Africa. Development of independent schools creates opportunities in public schools for new enrolments and saves the state significant capital outlay and running costs. A joint venture between various investors and Old Mutual’s Schools Fund will accelerate access to quality education. It will also support government in addressing South Africa’s educational needs in the lower-income market under the brand of Meridian Schools. Curro will expand its independent school group through new developments and acquisitions. This strategy will not only support the public sector but will provide parents with additional options for their children’s education, as independent schools increasingly improve educational standards – this will positively impact the development of the South African population and economic growth.

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The Diocesan School of the Diocese of Cape Town - for boys only, normal in those times - was established in 1849 by Bishop Robert Gray, and opened its doors in Maynier’s Cottage in the grounds of the Bishop’s residence, Protea, now called Bishopscourt. Its object was ‘to give a sound Education to the Youth of the Colony’, conducted on the principles of the English Church. The first Principal was the Revd HM White, an English clergyman. Gray clearly had it in mind that this school would be different from the other grammar schools that he was establishing during the first years of his time in South Africa. He envisaged a lower school (boys aged 10 to 17) and an upper department (boys older than that) and when in 1874 the University of the Cape of Good Hope was instituted, university classes were set up as part of the Collegiate School, this was clearly in line with Gray’s orginal intentions. As the formal name of the school is quite a mouthful, the school has been referred to as ‘Bishops’ (the school of the Bishop) from the very beginning. The most worthwhile legacy you can leave your son is an education that recognises and encourages that special spark within each boy to catch fire; that provides him with the best academic grounding he can get, the foundation of a healthy physical lifestyle, opportunities to develop his cultural and social world, and one that enfolds him with values, and an understanding of the role of a spiritual component to life. As a boys’ school, we actively address what it means to be a boy, and how young boys can develop into mature men. Once a boy leaves school, it is right that he turns to new opportunities, new challenges, but we believe that the bond formed at school should be maintained and that friendships grown in school can be encouraged to remain through the association with the old boys’ union. Bishops aims in all we do to inspire our boys to find something that they are passionate about, and then provide them with all the resources possible to develop that passion. We expose boys to a wide range of activities, and watch closely to see what catches, what grows. Our boys are hugely busy, but in the end, they benefit from and enjoy the range of things they can do. The education we provide is based on the South African National curriculum, and we offer a wide range of subjects within a technology rich environment – one which provides them with exposure to the connectedness and resources of today’s world. Our boys produce exam results which have been ranked in the top ten schools of the Western Cape for the past four years, they participate in and achieve good results in national Olympiads. Our classroom are richly resourced, and our teaching staff are men and women of the highest calling. All boys engage with sport in various ways. At the heart of their sporting requirements lies the belief that boys need vigorous physical activity to grow; that healthy competition results in maturity of spirit; that habits of exercise that are planted young continue to provide benefits long after school has been left behind them, and we know that the sharing of victory and defeat in games contributes massively to the camaraderie and fellowship which binds the school and the family of the school together. We all live in cultural and social contexts, and activities which expose us to our cultural backgrounds and to the cultural diversity of South Africa develop and enrich us. The annual Eisteddfod in which all boys take part is one of the key highlights of each year; the dramatic, musical and social events each year ensures that everyone can both observe and participate in. We believe that the role of a values-based life-style in the development of fully rounded and fulfilled men is vital, and we constantly return to our values base to determine actions and programmes in the school. We are an Anglican Christian foundation, and Chapel plays a role in the daily life of the school, but we are open to all faiths, and we make provision for boys to meet their own religious practices. We know that the bonds forged between boys at school endure, and provide support and strength to many during both the good and bad times that life confronts us with. The Old Diocesan Union has branches all over the world, and reunions held at the school regularly bring together huge numbers of old boys, even up to fifty or sixty years after they had left school. We respect these gatherings within the school, because joining the school as a boy becomes a life-long journey with the school’s wider family.

 Listings /  Africa

Founded in 1953 on a farm in the Randburg district, the College today is encircled by the northern suburbs of Johannesburg. Established as a boys’ school, the College took the bold step to build a girls’ school on the campus in 1995, creating the possibility of a unique synergy model. St Stithians is a Methodist School and a circuit of the Central District of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa. The College subscribes to a Statement of Spirituality that outlines our core beliefs and values. Students enter the College through the gateway of the Junior Preparatory on the lower campus, a co-educational school of 470 to 475 girls and boys in Grades R to 2. From Grade 3 onwards, the boys and girls move into separate Preparatory Schools, the Boys' Preparatory and the Girls' Preparatory, of 410 to 420 students each. A second "gateway" into St Stithians is offered to entrants of Grade 8 as they embark on their high school journey in the Boys’ College of 770 to 780 students and the Girls’ College of 500 to 510 students. The academic programme is delivered by excellent teachers, trained to nurture inquiry, explicit thinking, and differentiated learning. The College offers academic support and extension, enriching the core experiences of teaching and learning. A number of benchmarks, both national and international, provide a framework for evaluating quality. As a member of ISASA, the College participates in the cycle of institutional evaluation provided through the Independent Quality Assurance Agency (IQAA) and St Stithians is accredited by Umalusi, the South African certification authority. St Stithians offers a diverse and rich extra-curricular programme, aimed to provide opportunities for a holistic education. All the major sports are offered, supported by excellent sporting facilities and coaching. The cultural calendar and the performing arts are integral to our education. There is a strong focus on educating leaders, who participate in rites of passage as they move through the schools. Community service activities are integrated into the curriculum, as are outdoor education camps and outings. Our campus is a place of natural beauty, with various landscape zones, and the College is committed to being an environmentally "green" school. St Stithians seeks to provide a values-based and top-quality academic education, supported by a diverse extra-curricular offering. Our students matriculate as well-rounded individuals, well prepared to inspire excellence and make a difference both in our own country, the African continent and globally.

 Listings /  Africa

We are called to challenge the minds, feed the souls, fire the imaginations and train the bodies of the girls and young women who are entrusted to us. Our school is the place where we grow their capacity for mutual and self-respect. Here, we prepare our girls to learn and develop confidently, to build key knowledge frameworks that will stand them in good stead for the rest of their lives, to play passionately and to give generously of themselves to each other and to the wider community. We provide opportunities that build character and encourage self-sufficiency. It is our mission to assist our girls to open themselves up to all possibilities, to explore their unique potentials and to identify their distinctive and various abilities so that they can become their best selves. We call it ‘unlocking potential and building brilliance’ and believe that each young girl has her own measure of brilliance that needs to be unleashed for her to lead a happy and fulfilling life. It is an objective to provide our girls with the tools of rigorous and passionate enquiry and self-expression so that they may know themselves in the world. Education is a serious business but schools should be places of fun, community and ‘soft landings’. We strive to support our girls through our systems of pastoral care and peer group mentoring. Our school chaplain and resident counsellors are key members of our staff. Here, your girls are encouraged to “stress-test” their ideas, to learn from their mistakes, to nurture their passions and grow their interests and talents. This is a school that is supportive of and interested in each individual, a school that challenges each girl to explore and discover her best self. We are a school that celebrates diversity, and holds the concept as a core value. We encourage diversity of interests, outlooks and ambitions and do not subscribe to ‘type’. We strive to be a happy, vibrant and representative community where each person is valued in the wider South African context. We acknowledge the complexity and inequity of our country’s history and our responsibility towards the creation of an equitable society. We are proud of our rich heritage as a school that opened its doors to all races and creeds in the Apartheid era and we embrace the future enthusiastically. As critical thinkers, creative problem solvers and compassionate human beings, our girls are prepared by their educational experience to become persuasive and courageous citizens, able to take their rightful places in the larger communities of city, nation and the world.

 Listings /  Africa

Mandy Shrimpton is the quintessential people’s person. Mandy believes that success is measured by the quality of our human-relationships rather than the results we manifest through sheer will. Mandy firmly established herself as the heart of the non-profit organisation that she co-founded and ran with her adoring husband for 17 years. Mandy loves walking in nature with her family, hugging trees, and preserving the environment. She also enjoys being creative and is particularly fond of painting flowers. As a very happily married and devoted mother to four children, Mandy has cultivated a deep appreciation for the culinary arts and relishes the spare moments she gets to watch her favourite cooking shows. This initiative reflects how Mandy sees the world, helping to create positive synergy. Fostering unity and courteous community, building partner relationships and motivating affiliates. Born and bred in Africa, Mandy understands the concept of Ubuntu. I am, because we are. Together we can make the world a better place. Using her skills and experience to make a difference. Helping others see through the fog of new technologies, avoid common marketing mistakes and develop better business strategies. With a subtle blend of motherhood and effective project management, Mandy is the perfect professional partner, to show others the merits of this initiative. Shining a light on the path to prosperity, while not losing our footing in family values and humble humanity. Sharing is caring, while enriching ourselves spiritually and materially. We cannot give freely, if we don't have. "Sometimes the world makes more sense, through the eyes of a mother. Using protective instinct and family fortitude, to help one another." ~ Mandy Shrimpton

 Partners /  Africa

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